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Old 06-08-2007, 05:12 PM
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supplements good for the mind


Dear All,

this is my first post, I think it is great to have a place where one can discuss this topic, thank you to the site operators

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Being a sufferer for the past 27 years of grand mal type, I was wondering if anyone had any views or experiences of using supplements to increase the ability of the mind using...

Ginkgo Bibola?
Skull cap?
St Johns wart?
Gotu kola?
Ginseng?
Any others?

My epilepsy is mainly under control, but I have noticed I do not have the thinking capacity as my family, friends and work colleagues?

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I have been told that sufferes tend to need more sleep than non suffers, which I am experiencing BUT if I have to take lamotrogine which makes me sleepy this only increases my need to sleep, how do people out there cope with a 9-5 job, after waking up at 6am??
(other than sleeping earlier :wink: )

I thank you in advance for your replies

Regards,

Ajay
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Old 06-09-2007, 06:55 AM
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Hi Ajay, welcome to the forum.

The following pages discuss herbs and epilepsy:

Quote :
In discussing these herbs, Dr. Pearl concentrated primarily on risks and adverse effects of each herb, which are actually “more available in the literature than good evidence of efficacy,” while Dr. Conry reviewed pharmacokinetics, direct effect on seizures, and pharmacodynamic interactions. She reported that she could find no mechanism of action or laboratory or clinical evidence of effect on seizures for American hellebore, betony, blue cohosh, mugwort, pipsissewa, or scullcap.
Patients with Epilepsy Increasingly Embrace Alternative and Complementary Medicines

Quote :
Herbs said to be good for epilepsy include:
  • Blue vervain, for absence seizures, especially if associated with seizures triggered by menstrual attacks.
  • Hyssop, which may be used in absence attacks.
  • Lobelia, which is said to have a general depressant action on the central nervous system and so can be prescribed for epilepsy.
  • Skullcap, which is supposed to relax states of nervous tension and the central nervous system.
  • Chinaberry. Chinaberry juice has been studied in animals for its anti-convulsive properties. Results suggest that it may contain an ingredient that has long-acting anti-epileptic power.
  • Nine-Herbal Extract. This has been used by the Japanese to help decrease seizures. Researchers are reported to have found that it decreases seizures in mice.
  • Cannabis/Marijuana. Cannabis is an anti-convulsant, analgesic, used as a sedative or narcotic agent. A study in 1980 by Dr J Cunha seemed to show that cannabis had beneficial effects for people with epilepsy. However, reliable documentation of the effectiveness of marijuana as an anti-epileptic medication is extremely limited at this time. While some accounts show a reduction in seizure frequency and/or severity in some people who have epilepsy, others suggest that marijuana may actually trigger seizures in some people. Because the potency and chemical composition varies widely between plants and growing conditions, the use of marijuana would have to be carefully controlled using scientific testing. Further investigation is needed to determine the effectiveness of cannabis as an anti-epileptic drug, as well as to determine the potentially negative side effects associated with its use. The Canadian federal government recently approved research into the medicinal use of cannabis in controlled clinical settings. With further research, the potential benefits and risks of marijuana use will be better understood.
epilepsy - Henry Spink Foundation

One thing to keep in mind is that seizures are what happens when the brain becomes overactive. Any stimulants could potentially increase seizure activity.

Personally, I believe that herbs work in the short term to correct imbalances in the body, but are not a long term solution. You would do better IMO to find a diet that provides your body with everything it needs to maintain a good healthy balance.

P.S. If you are suffering from chronic fatigue, you might also consider getting checked for sleep apnea.
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Old 10-14-2007, 01:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Bernard View Post:
Hi Ajay, welcome to the forum.

The following pages discuss herbs and epilepsy:



Patients with Epilepsy Increasingly Embrace Alternative and Complementary Medicines



epilepsy - Henry Spink Foundation

One thing to keep in mind is that seizures are what happens when the brain becomes overactive. Any stimulants could potentially increase seizure activity.

Personally, I believe that herbs work in the short term to correct imbalances in the body, but are not a long term solution. You would do better IMO to find a diet that provides your body with everything it needs to maintain a good healthy balance.

P.S. If you are suffering from chronic fatigue, you might also consider getting checked for sleep apnea.

Lobelia is considered a potentially toxic herb I wouldnt take labelia for seizures


Precautions
The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, contain substances that can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, herbs should be taken with care, under the supervision a health care provider.

Lobelia is considered a potentially toxic herb. Active substances in lobelia bind to nicotine receptors in the nervous system and can cause serious symptoms, such as profuse sweating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, rapid heartbeat, mental confusion, convulsions, hypothermia, coma, and even death. You should not exceed a total daily dosage of 20 mg lobelia. Doses higher than 500 mg are highly toxic and could be fatal.

People with high blood pressure, heart disease, tobacco sensitivity, paralysis, seizure disorder, and shortness of breath, and those recovering from shock should not take lobelia. Pregnant and breast-feeding women should also avoid this herb.

Love angel
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Old 10-14-2007, 01:31 AM
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MJ= lol

Last edited by angel; 10-26-2007 at 08:16 AM.
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Old 10-14-2007, 05:14 AM
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Someone should tell the Henry Spink Foundation then. Thanks for the info Angel.

From the same page you quoted above:
Quote :
It is important to note that lobelia is a potentially toxic herb. Lobelia can be safely used in very small doses (particularly homeopathic doses), but moderate-to-large doses can cause serious adverse effects ranging from dry mouth and nausea to convulsions and even coma (see Precautions). Under the guidance of a qualified health care provider, however, lobelia, in combination with other herbs that affect the respiratory system, is considered relatively safe.
Lobelia
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Old 10-14-2007, 02:10 PM
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Hi Ajay welcome to the board !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have used acupuncture to help me with the side effects of the meds . Vitmains and herbs to supplement me . When I ran out of meds switched to homeopathy and the Gard diet.

Riva
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