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  #21  
Old 09-26-2012, 08:58 PM
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Thanks for all the links to the studies, Keith. The question is, if gut health does indeed influence at least some types of epilepsy, then what can be done to promote better gut health.

It seems that the medical community believes that probiotics are only of limited value, especially since many of which are sold as such don't even contain live bacteria.

Jonathan used to drink Kefir every day, but now that he's on the Ketogenic diet, it's hard to work yogurt into the allowed carbs. However, the Ketogenic diet itself seems to help with gut problems such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth.

Jon's chronic diarrhea disappeared for the first year that he was on the Keto diet, but since he had that bad viral infection in March, he has been having diarrhea several times a week. We've removed most raw veggies and nightshades, as these seemed to contribute, and eating carrots regularly seems to help.

Starting today, we're beginning a trial of no dairy -- just to see. He never had a problem with dairy in the past, but perhaps he's developed an intolerance.
  #22  
Old 09-26-2012, 08:59 PM
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OH yes, and there's also the issue of medications causing gut problems. Jon started Zonegran a month ago, and has had annorexia ever since.
  #23  
Old 09-28-2012, 01:34 AM
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Karen, surely you mean something other than annorexia. Please advise.

That's great to hear your experience with the ketogenic diet and helping resolve SIBO. It's basically removing the food source of overgrowth: carbs and starch. Then over time the diet actually lowers ketones such as acetone made by microbes such as clostridium bacteria. Clostridium have a bad reputation these days as high in autism and, of course, the C. diff epidemic. They actually have extremely important function producing butyrate, but overgrown is another story. I don't believe acetone at toxic levels in the brain is generally considered of gut origin. People generally believe the diet raises ketones, opposite of the truth.

I'm hardly expert in anything I've said here, but I'll tell you how I approached it with our clustering dog. The problem is the testing seems very limited. In the future, I'd like to see a Gut Flora Index so we know more about the actual imbalance. This is why gut-healing is more art than science, it's like shooting in the dark. I do believe there are some pretty good tests available now, but I'm not sure how good, the ones I've seen may be quite limited. There's a lab in Georgia USA called Metametrix that may have some good tests, I'm not sure. I know they found high protozoans in autism.

I'll spare you the earlier protocols of the nearly four year gut-healing odyssey even though there are many great products. Basically, I put her on a month of Rifaximin to clean out her gut, stopping when she began bedwetting which went away when I began lots of probiotics. Previous to Rifaximin she could never have taken those probiotics without seizure. Then I started her on bee propolis and things were looking up. I believe propolis may be an excellent natural antibiotic. It's also antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antihistamine. The more I learn about it, the more impressed. It should be used very carefully as it's powerful. I've always wondered if it wasn't the thing that would have resolved her problem because it's able to kill bacterial spores where pharmaceutical antibiotics fail.

Some general ideas, I'm a believer in gelatin, powdered and bone broth. Clays are also good such as French Green and bentonite. Colloidal silver appeared to be the reason she went four months seizure-free, but then things grow back, I guess. Hyaluronic acid has good gut application. Zinc carnosine seems like a good thing. Selenium may be very important; I like the organic selenocysteine stuff and also the Lewis Labs Brewer's Yeast has a lot of selenium (no surprise!!) and is prebiotic (beware prebiotics as counterproductive, but who knows). Ohhh yes, also homemade kefir of three types (dairy, coconut milk, water) are very easy to make and are said to colonize better than capsuled probiotics. Heck, you may as well throw in some grape seed extract, pomegranate extract and boron, feel free to laugh now. Personally, I've been enjoying making beet kvass, basically a water kefir and quite powerful. There's an interesting yeast-based probiotic called Florastor commonly used a few hours after an antibiotic as would bacterial probiotics.

In hindsight, I would have preferred not using an antibiotic other than propolis as I'm concerend about collateral damage to beneficial flora on a deeper level, but maybe that was necessary. These anaerobic or gram-negative bacteria may be hard to reach, especially with biofilm. People use enzymes of several types and there are a class of colitis drugs made with a derivative of salicyclic acid which may be a good thing to dissolve biofilm. A very gentle, yet powerful enzyme seems to be nattokinase.

One more thing I've discovered recently I'm excited about is intermittent fasting (IF). Basically, you give yourself an 8 hour daily eating window such as 12-8pm. There are other ways to do it such as just fasting two days/week, but I think the daily eating window is more powerful in allowing the gut to reset itself, raising stomach acid which drives the system. High stomach acid is crucial for nutrient absorption and defense. SIBO apparently lowers stomach acid, so another natural antibiotic to consider is oregano oil which is extremely powerful, said to help in case of mycoplasma. By the way, that's maybe the third time in my life I've typed the word mycoplasma, oops there's another one. Lots of people take betaine HCL in a capsule, it's stomach acid. Food combing is separating foods to help with digestion such as not mixing protein with carbs. And why not eat salads last like the French and Italians? Chlorophyll shuts down poisons from indigestion such as guanadine and maybe ammonia, I forget at the moment. By the way, carrots and peanuts contain the powerful antifungal, phytoalexin. I believe it's the reason 25% of Europe is supposedly allergic to carrots. It's similar to the dreaded peanut allergy, but not nearly as bad. I believe the mechanism is angry yeast dysregulating immune response as their DNA is strikingly similar to human . . . as if they hold the key to our locks.

Last edited by Keith; 09-28-2012 at 02:35 AM.
  #24  
Old 09-28-2012, 11:21 PM
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A disturbing mystery is self-induced photosensitive epilepsy (PSE). it appears to have been fairly well studied without much progress.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12169155

It's as if there's some form of perverse pleasure akin to an insect flying into a flame or a doe caught in the headlights. I believe I've read of certain people actually prizing their epilepsy, such as the poet Lord Byron. Here's one paper about self-induced PSE called the Sunflower Syndrome:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6854340

A facebook page about it:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sunflo...02595293101717

What might cause this kind of conditioning; where's the "pleasure" in it? There may be a histamine connection similar to the alcohol-histamine relationship. This article describes a study showing pleasure increased when histamine is blocked at the H3 receptor: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0616080147.htm

It's long known UV light causes release of histamine:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8618023
http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.230...21101088849573

So there may be some kind of dynamic taking place between UV light and the H3 histamine receptor activating pleasure. Histamine excess of gut origin may be the crucial factor. Neuronal histamine receptor research is way over my head and there's a lot of it available on the net. The connections between histamine, light and pleasure are compelling in explaining photosensitive seizure, self-induced and otherwise, related to optic nerve inflammation. The H3 receptor is said to control release and synthesis of histamine at nerve endings:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...,f1000m,isrctn
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2454293

Perhaps sunlight leads to H3 inhibition associated with self-induced pleasure. There are many drugs targeting H3. It's the subject of sleep-wake cycles associated with light and also epilepsy itself as well as obesity:
http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/1553...jACMaZRL2yAc.0
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2483387/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15319804
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...nticated=false

Not suprisingly, H3 is studied related to seasonal affective disorder, down-regulated during short days to keep hamsters happy!
http://endo.endojournals.org/content/146/4/1930.long

And here's a 2008 paper talking about an H3 antagonist drug called Tiprolisant in trial showing promise in photosensitive seizure:
https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article..._2163/_article

Here's more info about the drug which may just treat the symptoms and not address actual cause (microbial intestinal imbalance):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitolisant

Last edited by Keith; 09-29-2012 at 12:22 AM.
  #25  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:47 PM
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Yes, I do mean anorexia -- refusing to eat OR drink. And this the kid who would devour his meal in 5 minutes prior to taking Zonegran. I don't think it has anything to do with body image, like when teens having anorexia, but it's just an aversion to food. At any rate, that's the term his doctor is using.

We're having to come up with meals that are small in portion size, but dense in calories so he doesn't lose weight (he's already very lean, and was underweight earlier in the year). He also doesn't want to chew anything -- like meat. So...his protein now is eggs and fish.

We were giving him cheese also as a protein, but are giving him a trial for a few days on dairy free to see if it helps anything (after 3 days, no decrease in seizures, but also no diarrhea; however, his autistic symptoms became very pronounced yesterday -- he started growling/grunting and very rigid in late morning, and that behavior continued throughout the day, until he got his magnesium at suppertime, and that seemed to alleviate his symptoms).

We started him on probiotics yesterday, that also contain Oligosaccharide. I'd never heard of that, so looked it up (concerned, for one thing about carbs) -- as I understand it, it's a type of sugar but also a type of fiber, and it isn't absorbed by the small intestine, about 90% of it passed through to the large intestine, where it promotes the growth of healthy bacteria. So...I gave him a half dose of that yesterday, and it didn't cause any increase in seizures, so will go with a full dose today.

Jonathan gets Selenium in his vitamin/supplement formula -- and that formula seems to be very helpful with seizure control. However, his most recent order of the supplements are currently sitting down at Thai customs -- the Thai FDA considers it a "medicine" and won't release it without a medical import license, so I think I'm out $300, and with only a one-month supply of his supplements left.

We used to use (sugar free) gelatin with Jon a lot, but haven't recently.
***********

On the topic of the "fly drawn to the light" -- this is exactly what happens to Jon at night. If there's ANY light in the room at all -- like the little light on the AC unit, or the light on the laptop, or anything like that, he is drawn to it like a moth to a flame. He will go and just stare at it, and often has a seizure when doing that.

Yesterday, he looked out at the balcony, and the light was reflecting off some puddles, and went into a seizure just like that.

And right now, I have the remote control in my hand, because he is watching his video, but keeps wanting to go right up to the screen, and when he does that, he often has a seizure. So, I turn it off until he sits down, and then turn it on again.
  #26  
Old 10-01-2012, 12:27 AM
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Karen, I feel basically clueless, wondering if it's best to add probiotics or use natural antibiotics like propolis, oregano oil and colloidal silver. Maybe both approaches simultaneously, spaced a few hours apart. That's one way to shift flora similar to the approach used in C. diff where antibiotics are used and then a few hours later a probiotic. At the same time, I wonder if a low histamine diet would be effective in decreasing photosensitive seizure, maybe even trying Histame or some other DAO enzyme product to break down histamine.

Based on my own theory of excess histamine of gut origin, I wonder if shifting flora away from histamine producing microbes such as gram-negative bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine would help.

I wonder how an H3 histamine receptor activation drug would work as opposed to the antagonist described above as the most recent papers seem to favor activation. Perhaps shifting gut flora would serve to activate H3 and H4 receptors in order to lower excess. I'm just learning aloud.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...BDB9B6D.d03t01
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...749.x/abstract
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...nticated=false
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...20121110000665

Last edited by Keith; 10-01-2012 at 12:54 AM.
  #27  
Old 10-01-2012, 10:45 AM
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Natural antihistamine foods:
http://blogs.bergen.com/blogs/liya/c...e_dense_foods/

Seems to me a diet deficient in dark leafy greens feeds imbalance. I think raw is best including broccoli. Between chlorophyll and phytochemicals, it's a good way to shift flora in the right direction.
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/natur...histamine.html
http://maxcelint.com/NaturalHealthDi...hytonutrients/

Phytochemical in broccoli inhibits inflammation and histamine release:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0609123334.htm
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18805511

One seemingly overlooked mechanism of how greens balance flora involves auxin, a phytohormone normally associated with plants, yet is known to be present in human urine and serum. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...203.x/abstract

Auxin's relationship to ethylene biosynthesis is especially interesting as ethylene is known to draw out the powerful antifungal, phytoalexin. This is why you're not supposed to store apples next to carrots as ethylene released from apples makes carrots bitter, but at least the carrot won't have a yeast infection!

This is hardly a laughing matter as I've read 25% of Europe is now allergic to carrots. Moreover, deadly peanut allergy on the rise may be explained by phytoalexin content leading to fungi causing an overactive immune response. Fungal DNA is strikingly similar to human DNA, suggesting they hold the key to our locks:
http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jun...bowel-20120608

Last edited by Keith; 10-01-2012 at 12:03 PM.
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  #28  
Old 10-03-2012, 12:31 PM
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Diabetic retinopathy and histamine excess of gut origin not yet on the map as diabetes isn't yet considered a matter of microbial imbalance of the small intestine (even though gastric bypass surgery halts diabetes rapidly by removing infected duodenum). "Intravascular histamine infusion causes leakage and reduced electrical resistance of cerebral vessels, which is reversed by histamine H2 receptor antagonists. Furthermore, diabetic rats developed increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier within 2 to 4 weeks of the onset of hyperglycemia, which is reversed by histamine H1 receptor antagonists." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1312073/

Histamine causes small vessels in the gut to leak just as it does in eyes: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6222248

Histamine and GABA on the same ion channel where GABA causes retinal damage associated with epilepsy drug used in infants:
http://adc.bmj.com/content/85/6/469.full
http://www.jbc.org/content/283/16/10470.full
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  #29  
Old 10-03-2012, 08:37 PM
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OK, still working my way through everything you posted.

Good news -- Thai FDA has released our supplements (after a $100 bribe), so we should get the shipment today or tomorrow.

The silver - that's used here in Asia, especially in Japan, but I looked into that several years ago, and don't feel comfortable with it. For one thing, it can turn the skin grey, and while it does inhibit growth of bacteria in a petri dish, there's no studies indicating its usefulness or safety in the human body.

I used to give Jon lots of leafy green veggies (his favorite was turnip greens) and broccoli, but since his illness in March, he can't tolerate them -- they give him diarrhea every time. I tried just 2 days ago, mixing finely chopped spinach in with his egg, and that gave him a bad case of the runs. This is frustrating, because they are a good source of calcium, have excellent anti-inflammatory properties, not to mention other wonderful benefits, and they're one of the best foods to eat on the Ketogenic diet because most of them are extremely low in carbs.

The nightshade foods also seem to cause diarrhea, and he's had several seizures almost immediately after eating eggplant. He used to eat a lot of tomato, but now off that.

About the only veggies that he can tolerate now, without getting diarrhea, and that are allowed on the Keto diet are zucchini, mushrooms, cucumber, carrots, and asparagus. He also eats star fruit. He's not too crazy about cucumber, so we don't give that often, but he likes all the others.

I'm thinking about ginger and garlic....garlic as natural antibiotic and ginger good for gut and both are strongly anti-inflammatory. He can tolerate those, but will have to carefully calculate them in, because they're a bit high in carbs -- but since the Zonegran has destroyed his appetite, it's a good time to use them.
  #30  
Old 10-03-2012, 09:02 PM
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17915763

Looks like garlic, ginger, and tumeric all inhibit growth of bacteria producing histamine.

So...I'm going to sit down right now and calculate them into his diet -- not sure if tumeric is on the Ketocalculator, but if it isn't, I'll ask the nutritionist to add it in.
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Old 10-03-2012, 09:11 PM
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OH, he also eats avocado, onion, and olives.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by KarenB View Post:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17915763

Looks like garlic, ginger, and tumeric all inhibit growth of bacteria producing histamine.
Karen, thank you so much considering these things. My heart goes out to you. I'm no expert, so please continue to be careful with these ideas I'm presenting. I don't blame you for caution regarding colloidal silver, but I do firmly believed its reputation among many is not deserved. The problem may be it kills the good with the bad, so should only be used temporarily.

That study you found is very interesting. It also cites salt as antihistamine! I'm a believer in sea salt and have been using Himalayan. There are so many benefits to salt with minerals activating enzymes and "salt bridges" doing things in the brain I don't understand. I didn't know salt was also a natural antihistamine, but not surprised. Salt is also known to kill microbes such as yeast (ask any bread baker) and, of course, "salt in the wound" is ancient antiseptic.
http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/salt.htm

This is an interesting page regarding salt, excess histamine, allergy and mental health:
http://planetmommies.com/tag/antihistamine

Maybe ginger-beet kvass would be a good probiotic using water kefir grains and sea salt:
http://www.food.com/recipe/beet-and-...er-good-465590
http://www.deliciousobsessions.com/2...er-beet-kvass/

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  #33  
Old 10-04-2012, 08:34 PM
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Interesting about sea salt -- the problem of course is that it doesn't contain iodine. However, that's what Jon (and the rest of our family) used for the first 5 years of his life, because the island where we lived produced it -- it was pretty much all that was available.

They have salt flats between Bangkok (where we now live) and the sea (not far away), so I'm assuming the local salt here is probably also sea salt, but not sure.

Jon's sodium level was a bit high about a year ago, so I had stopped adding salt to his food, thinking that he would get enough from the olives, mayo and butter that is part of his daily diet. But last month, his electrolytes tested low for sodium, so we've added a little back in. He was back to normal level last week.
  #34  
Old 10-04-2012, 08:49 PM
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In Korea, they put salt in a bamboo tube, and plug at both ends with mud, and then that gets roasted. The salt absorbed the minerals from the bamboo and mud, which is believed to increase anti-cancer properties. This is called juk-yeom, or bamboo salt.

This bamboo salt is used to make the doenjang -- or soybean paste that is popular in Korea and more recently China. Doenjang is made by grinding up soybeans into a paste, then this is formed into blocks and fermented by wrapping rice plants around the blocks and putting out in the sun (the rice adds bacillus subtilis -- a good bacteria). This sits around for several months, then is put into pottery jars with brine (with bamboo salt) where it continues to ferment (something like yogurt). The liquid is the Korean soy sauce, and the more solid past is the doenjang -- and this is reported to have excellent health properties -- high in flavenoids, vitamins, lysene, and anti-cancer properties -- it is believed to promote long life.

It's best to buy the product in the farmers market, however, from the local Korean or Chinese farmers who produce it, because the factory made stuff usually has wheat in it, which can cause problems for those with gluten sensitivity.
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  #35  
Old 10-05-2012, 09:47 AM
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Karen, that's fascinating stuff. There are other sources of iodine, of course, such as sea kelp. Speaking of local foods, are you familiar with noni and soursop? I believe there may be a lot of noni grown in Thailand.

Maybe the most important factor with noni (also known as vomit fruit) is butyric acid (naturally in vomit!) which I believe best explains the French Paradox. Volatile fatty acids can balance gut flora, giving the immune system a fighting chance. Bacteria produce butyric, especially clostridium where overgrowth, i.e., C. diff and botulism, means too much of a good thing, damaging the intestinal lining (vilous atrophy). Soursop nutritional charts show no butyric acid, but I don't believe they can be trusted.
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Old 10-05-2012, 10:21 AM
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There's much overlap in research between epilepsy, autism, diabetes and obesity. Histamine excess in obesity is known as is high leptin and leptin resistance. Leptin controls neuronal histamine regulation while gut flora stimulate leptin synthesis in fat (adipose tissue). With histamine receptors in flux associated with pleasure/addiction, the situation may include inflammation of the hypothalamus. http://journals.cambridge.org/action...29665110001813
Microbiota stimulate leptin synthesis: http://journals.cambridge.org/action...29665110001813
Leptin controls neuronal histamine regulation: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10580415
H3 histamine receptor associated with pleasure regulates food intake: http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v1...y2006252a.html
http://www.pnas.org/content/101/44/15718.long
Bacterial Endotoxin Stimulates Leptin in the Human and Nonhuman Primate: http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/88/3/1285.full
Leptin resistance in hypothalamus caused by gram-negative bacterial product associated with SIBO: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2569852/
Hypothalamic inflammation:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20472136 http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&...page&q&f=false
http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&...page&q&f=false
http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v2.../0803036a.html

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  #37  
Old 10-05-2012, 09:21 PM
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"Noni" is "Yor" in Thailand, and used as a "traditional medicine" to treat arthritis, autoimmune diseasem, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, etc. One of the universities here has been studying the benefits of an extract made from the fermented fruit (the fruit is pretty bitter and has lots of seeds, so most Asians don't eat it unless there's a famine). It's high in vitamin C, vitamin B-complex, anti-oxidants, anthraquinones, flavonoids, saponins and scopoletin. Also a source of potassium, calcium, iron and selenium.

The Thai use the noni/yor leaves in some of their curries, and they made a tea from the leaves & fruit to treat vomiting, muscle cramps and high blood pressure.

Soursop is known as "foreign Durian" in Thailand, because it looks like our smelly but delicious "King of fruits." Thai like sweet foods (or outrageously spicy), and Soursop is a bit too acidic for their preference, but it is grown here in small amounts, in some provinces. It's also high in Vitamin C & B complex, and the seeds supposedly have anti-cancer properties, and it's also used topically for lice (seeds and I think the leaves). However, it does seem to have negative neurological effects -- seems to trigger Parkinson's disease, so probably not advised for epileptics.
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  #38  
Old 10-06-2012, 12:37 PM
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Karen, I don't believe the leaves or extract of noni would contain what I believe is the key ingredient applied to gut health: butyric acid. The whole fruit, however, probably does in good quantity, hence the term "vomit fruit" where butyric acid is a natural component of vomit. Hope I haven't ruined your lunch. These fruits are especially touted as anticancer.

Incidentally, butyric acid is also used by anti-whalers to spoil the catch on deck and make working conditions intolerable. It's all about digestion:
http://youtu.be/Arl88a-8IL0

Indigestion, on the other hand, leads to constipation which predicts seizure. I believe ghee is also a good source of butyric as well as butter and butter oil.

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  #39  
Old 10-06-2012, 01:51 PM
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Studies point to gram-negative bacterial overgrowth in SIBO; here's a new one: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968374

Study above reveals gram-negative bacterial overgrowth in ulcerative colitis. Gram-negative bacterial overgrowth is also associated with SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth). Toxins produced by gram-negative bacteria have function, but overgrown may cause leptin resistance including and maybe especially in the brain. In the hypothalamus are histamine receptors such as H3 associated with pleasure/addiction regulated by leptin. Leptin production is stimulated by bacteria. So, maybe some bacteria are increasing leptin which increases inflammatory histamine and mucin (mucus) in the intestinal lining. The study above shows low lactobacillus and also low Akkermansia which is somehow important to utilizing mucus for repair. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0016876

Antihistamines or the opposite, histamine receptor activation, may be useful in ulcerative colitis and, as discussed earlier in this thread, photosenstivie seizure. But how to balance gram-negative bacteria, perhaps the root cause of the problem?

Here's some background re: bacterial toxins stimulating leptin synthesis: http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/88/3/1285.full

Here's an example of leptin controlling inflammatory histamine. This is also studied in relation to obesity where it's known to cause hypothalamic inflammation. But in obesity there is overgrowth of lactobacillus in the small intestine and in UC lactobacillus is low: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10580415

Gram-negative bacteria is said to have resistance to propolis possibly because "their outer membrane inhibits and/or retards the penetration of propolis": http://www.academicjournals.org/jmpr...%20et%20al.pdf http://www.academicjournals.org/jmpr...%20et%20al.pdf

Oregano oil, on the other hand, is said to have good activity against gram-negative bacteria: www.pakbs.org/pjbot/PDFs/39(2)/PJB39(2)609.pdf

http://www.wellnessresources.com/hea...ell_membranes/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21168481

Oregano oil is not created equally; some are much stronger than others and there are lots of protocols for its use. I've read it can used very frequently throughout the day.

Maybe a nice report here: http://jptwellnesscircle.s3.amazonaw...regano-oil.pdf

Gram negative bacteria are also sensitive to colloidal silver, another natural antibiotic. There are basically two types on the market, ionic and regular. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15158396

Grapefruit seed extract is another natural antibiotic with activity against gram negative bacteria, but better against gram-positive: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs...55530260128023

So, maybe using natural antibiotics where bacteria have no resistance and also probiotics a few hours later several times/day would shift flora in the right direction. The challenge may be accessing gram-negative bacterial communities through their biofilm using salicylic acid drugs and enzymes . . . gut healing is far more art than science! It's still a mystery as to whether or not missing crucial bacterial needed for long term balance can be colonized. Maybe that's where fecal transplant is effective . . .

Last edited by Keith; 10-06-2012 at 01:53 PM.
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Janus (10-06-2012)
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Old 10-06-2012, 02:34 PM
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Great info and i love the video. That is powerful knowledge for us to have.
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