A useful tool

dawn9100

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Hi all I just wanted to share this app; SOS-QR. I have an iPhone, don’t know if it’s available for Android or Windows...

A few months ago I was found on the side of a busy street after a gran-mal, the EMTs called my dad (1700 miles away)- with the same last name while they were searching through my phone.

But with this- they can easily scan the code and see all the pertinent information! Your meds, your emergency contacts, etc! It’s like the equivalent of medical ID jewelry on your phone (I have it on my Apple Watch too!)!

Dawn


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resaebiunne

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I don't think apps like these are a good idea. EMTs typically don't look through your phone for emergency information and especially not in applications. In some states like california, it is illegal for police and emergency personnel to remove phones and wallets from your purse or pockets for liability reasons (they don't want to get sued by you for thinking items were stolen).

Many people report EMTs don't even look at jewelry.

Oh, also I was going to point out that apps on your phone prevent you from being able to put password locks on your phone, which I think is dangerous. Not only do the EMTs have access do your private information, but while you are incapacitated, someone could steal your phone and run off it with it. If you are like me, you can banking information and other sensitive information on your phone which you do not want in the hands of even a health professional.

Go with a MedicAlert. EMTs and emergency rooms are trained to recognize with they are, they are inexpensive and durable, and they won't get stolen like an iPhone will.
 

txtiger

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I don't think I"d go with an app either. I have a bracelet that I wear when I'm out walking/running, so that I don't have to carry an ID card/driver's license with me. It's called Road ID. It was really designed for use by people who are running, walking, biking, etc., but I suppose it could be used as another option for wearable identification by those who may need medical attention. You can order online, either just the wearable with the info you choose to put on it (DOB, medical condition, medication, emergency contact, etc.), or for a small fee (I think something like $10/year) you can put your information in their database, and your bracelet directs first responders to call the 800 number.

I don't know how useful it really is, but to my way of thinking, having an online account gives more space for multiple contacts and allows more easily for updating medication info, physician's name, etc.
 

CQ:)

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I use a medic alert bracelet which I always have on when I'm out. Years ago before I had a mobile phonei used to sometimes duck out quickly and only take my house keys & have no I.D so my bracelet saved me when I had a seizure down the street.

Now I always have my phone on me, the medicalert foundation which im registered with gives you 2 cards one for your wallet and one as an emergency that you can put somewhere at home. I put the wallet one in my phone & the emergency one which is only small in the pocket of my mobile phone holder.

Like resaebunnie I was unsure about apps but tried one a friend told me about called ICE- In Case Emergency which has my info in. When i have my phone locked it's on my locked screen and you can scroll down to see the relevant info eg: name, meds (including doseages which the medic alert doesnt have) & my ICE number which is my mum.
 
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