Drinking And Then In The ER, Do They Give You?

JLogefeil

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If you were drinking and you needed up in the ER, would they still give you AED like Ativan or dilatin though your IV? If not what do they do for you?
 

Cherriuz

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I have no personal experience on this. but I really think it would be a daft idea to mix sedatives with alcohol and I don't think it's something the hospital would risk.
 
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I would think they wouldn't give you something like Ativan... From what I have read on Keppra, it is less dangerous to take with alcohol, and it's fast acting, so they might give someone that? I researched into Keppra and actually didn't really see anything about the interaction.
 

no.guru

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Dilantin doesn't mix well with alcohol, so I doubt that would be given. It also causes drowsiness, and the prescription bottle warns against drinking because of the amplification of side effects.
 

Cint

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I would think they wouldn't give you something like Ativan... From what I have read on Keppra, it is less dangerous to take with alcohol, and it's fast acting, so they might give someone that? I researched into Keppra and actually didn't really see anything about the interaction.
:ponder: Well, here is what I found about Keppra and alcohol:

http://www.drugs.com/keppra.html

What should I avoid while taking Keppra?

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of Keppra and may also increase the risk of seizures. This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.


Keppra (levetiracetam) and Alcohol / Food Interactions


Keppra and Alcohol (Ethanol)

GENERALLY AVOID: Alcohol may potentiate some of the pharmacologic effects of CNS-active agents. Use in combination may result in additive central nervous system depression and impairment of judgment, thinking, and psychomotor skills.

MANAGEMENT: Patients receiving CNS-active agents should be warned of this interaction and advised to avoid or limit consumption of alcohol. Ambulatory patients should be counseled to avoid hazardous activities requiring complete mental alertness and motor coordination until they know how these agents affect them, and to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities.
I take 3000 mgs. of Keppra a day and wouldn't want the ER to give me more Keppra. Of course, I don't drink but a glass of wine every great once in a while. But my seizures are under much better control now, too.
 
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:ponder: Well, here is what I found about Keppra and alcohol:



I take 3000 mgs. of Keppra a day and wouldn't want the ER to give me more Keppra. Of course, I don't drink but a glass of wine every great once in a while. But my seizures are under much better control now, too.
I tried to quote the article you quoted, but it wouldn't let me, lol. I'm sure there is an interaction there, though it would probably have something to do with other factors as well - like how much you're on, what other stuff you're taking, size, etc. etc. It just seems like it would be less dangerous than something like Ativan, Valium, or other drugs used directly for sedatives. I drank with Keppra, and while the alcohol seemed to get to me faster, I was okay. I just drank less. Of course, I guess if you were brought into the E.R. all ready drunk... it might be hard to say! I'm definitely no pharmacist, just a person who likes to research EVERYTHING, lol.
 
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Wow, my grammar sucks today. I almost spelled news as noos earlier, and other drugs used directly for sedatives should have been other drugs used directly for sedating... Yah for not enough sleep1
 

Cint

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It just seems like it would be less dangerous than something like Ativan, Valium, or other drugs used directly for sedatives.
For some folks with E, alcohol in small amounts does not cause any problems, depending on the type of seizures, one's metabolism, etc. More info on the subject: http://www.epilepsy.com/EPILEPSY/pROVOKE_ALCOHOL

And info on meds used in the ER for seizures:

http://professionals.epilepsy.com/page/epilepticus_managing.html


Of course, I guess if you were brought into the E.R. all ready drunk... it might be hard to say! I'm definitely no pharmacist, just a person who likes to research EVERYTHING, lol.
Anyone already drunk and going to the ER, plus taking seizure meds is acting foolishly.
What is the purpose of drinking when one already has enough problems to deal with?! :ponder:
 
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