What part of the brain is used for speech and memory?

RachelR

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Just wondering what part of the brain is used for speech and memory, as recently my memory has been bad (I find I am unable to cram for exam and remember everything for them)? My seizure start in my right temporal lobe? Does anyone know if this affects memory and speech?
 

RachelR

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Thanks bernard, it probably explains why my right temporal lobe seizures cause memory loss and speech problems and its nice to know whether its the drugs or illness which causes the side effects.
 
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I had my brain mapped out and my memory is on my left side. I am basically left handed and left brained. That is why I had my rtl.
 

Mandy

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Hi! I was told that memory and speech is generated from the left temporal lobe. However in some of the studies they did, they noticed that some people who have seizures in their left temporal lobe,may use their right temporal lobe for memory and speech. I found out a couple weeks ago i was a candidate for surgery. I have seizures in my left temporal lobe and i'm participating in a study on Wednesday. The study is based on memory in epileptics compared to non-epileptics. It will make my decision alot easier because they will be able to determine where my memory is located. Good luck and take care!
 

RobinN

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Good Luck Mandy. I do hope this will help with your decision.

Neurofeedback is suppose to help with memory and speech. Too bad they are willing to try that first, before talking surgery. I know it is helping my daughter, her cognitive functions are improving with therapy.
 

KelVarQ

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Stilldancing, I had RTL surgery as well and I'm also left handed. I had to do a few extra tests prior to surgery to ensure the surgery would not interfere with my speech and thankfully it didn't. Do you have problems with Visual Memory now? I'm literally like blind in the mind today, but I can get a glimpse. I can hold a picture for a second or two and I have problem remembering new people, directions going from one place to another and I can't do math in my head at all since I can't hold the numbers in my head long enough to do the math. Apparently visual memory was my RTL and that was pretty much removed. I just say thank G-d for technology (video cameras and GPS)! I can do math on paper since I can see the numbers, but not in my head. How's you visual memory? People I knew prior to surgery I have no problem, only those I meet after surgery. I can meet someone in the morning and see them the next day shopping or something and I have no clue who they are. Doesn't affect me too much since I'm a stay home mom, but I would imagine if I had to go to work everyday (depending on what I'm doing) that could be a problem. Just curious if you have visual memory problems.
 

dfwtexas

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Bernard,
thanks for that link, very interesting. I swear I learn something new from here all the time!
 

Cinnabar

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Rachel, I have Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and my MRI results showed that my left hippocample volume was 50% less than that of the right. My neurologist explained that the the "left" hippocampus is the area in the brain which houses memory (and emotions) and that surrounding regions of the hippocampus have been compensating. My memory is fairly adequate (save being in post-ictal state) so I suppose the regions surrounding the hippocampus have been doing their job. From what I understand, language is also handled in the left hemisphere of the brain in the cerebral cortex.

You might want to look into Neumonic Devices to assist your memory. For example if I'm at at party and want to remember Wanda's name, I'll think of a magic wand. You can also employ neumonic rhyming. If you have to remember the famous Mark Twain in some context for an exam, think of Fame/Twain. Worked for me when in college. Oh, another idea. Record questions and answers for an exam and play it right before you go to sleep. We remember best at night, directly before we hit the pillow. Good luck with your exams!
 
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McGill

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First, I'm no authority on memory. This I can say with certainty: I did a paper on memory - both long term & short term - when I was in university for which I received an A+. Anatomy and Physiology of humans (human biology, in this case) was another subject which I studied.

I hope I don't present myself as a "know it all", for that's the furthest thing from the truth! I'm used to doing research on such topics, although I don't have a Master's nor Ph.D.

The area of the brain used for speech is an area on the left side of the brain
(I'm nor sure whether or not it's the parietal lobe or temporal lobe) is an area called "Broca's Area."

As for memory, which type are you talking about? (Again I'm asking for specific information.)

There is "Long Term Memory" and "Short Term Memory." It also depends upon the circumstances under which you are tryiung to memorize something. For example, if I'm cramming for an exam, I'll probably remember enough information to pass the exam. (That could follow under "Short Term Memory.)If, on the other hand, you read or learn about something which gives you a pleasurable experience from early childhood and you can vividly recall it, that's "Long Term Memory."

Another type of memory associated with learning is cognition. That also plays a role in what & how you learn. I need to learn more about this.
 
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A good example of that would be a child that has a hemispherectomy and the other side of the brain is able to take over functions of the missing hemisphere. The human body is absolutely amazing which should give hope to all of us!
 

RobinN

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That is exactly what that video presents. Pretty awesome if I do say so myself.
 

Cint

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The area of the brain used for speech is an area on the left side of the brain
(I'm nor sure whether or not it's the parietal lobe or temporal lobe) is an area called "Broca's Area."

As for memory, which type are you talking about? (Again I'm asking for specific information.)

There is "Long Term Memory" and "Short Term Memory." It also depends upon the circumstances under which you are tryiung to memorize something. For example, if I'm cramming for an exam, I'll probably remember enough information to pass the exam. (That could follow under "Short Term Memory.)If, on the other hand, you read or learn about something which gives you a pleasurable experience from early childhood and you can vividly recall it, that's "Long Term Memory."

Another type of memory associated with learning is cognition. That also plays a role in what & how you learn. I need to learn more about this.
The Broca's area is in the temporal lobe. The Broca's Area controls Facial neurons, speech production, and understanding of language.

I had a Left Temporal Lobectomy and have problems with short term memory. I can remember meeting people, but have trouble remembering names, directions, suffer from aphasia (finding words when trying to describe something), have trouble now with spelling, am dyslexic now, can't do math in my head now, have to write down reminders every day. I can understand what is being described or explained as it is being done, however, the next day I may have trouble recalling it.
They said my real problem is deep in the hippocampus so if I were to have any more brain surgery, I would end up like an advanced Alzheimer's patient. And part of the damaged area is the Wernicke's. The Wernicke's area is located in the left temporal lobe, posterior to the primary auditory complex.
Functions of the Wernicke's include: Language Comprehension, Recognition, Interpretation, and Semantic processing.
 

McGill

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Thanks for the information. I've been trying to learn constantly about the brain's physiology; not that I'll ever know everything!!
 
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Well, I will tell you this, that this is why they map every bodys brain before surgery. They can only give you a generic Idea of where everything comes from. But the doctors are not going to give you a test that costs thousands of dollars for nothing.My epileptologist told me that everybodys brain is different. Thats why we have our brain mapped out and also why meds work differently, well partly the reason anyway.My short term crashed after my surgery.
 
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