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  #41  
Old 09-15-2011, 06:17 AM
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Does it actually stop the hair loss?
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  #42  
Old 09-15-2011, 10:41 AM
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Now this is tricky! Actually biotin binds easily with proteins and that way hair loss increase in some cases as the hair do not get the requiired proteins. the solution is using shampoo with biotin and this may help. By the way, what is ur blood type, Blood type A has problem with biotin absorption on ingestion.
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  #43  
Old 09-15-2011, 10:47 AM
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I've read that biotin shampoos don't work because the biotin doesn't get absorbed into the scalp.
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  #44  
Old 09-15-2011, 11:21 AM
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now am confused cuz am getting told it does work and that it doesnt, am going crazy hear like, my hair is getting thinner and thinner. i have got some biotin to try. taking 2 tablets of it a day. im not sure of my blood type.
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  #45  
Old 09-15-2011, 01:55 PM
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Yes, Biotin can help with hair loss caused by anti-epileptic drugs.

Biotin supplements can help reverse hair loss, but it only works if your hair loss is due to a biotin deficiency. A number of things can cause Biotin to be depleted from your body: low-calorie diets; a malabsorption syndrome; antibiotics like sulfonamides that decrease biotin production in your gut; and anticonvulsant therapy. Supplemental biotin has been suggested for patients who are treated with anticonvulsants (including Keppra) that have been linked to biotin deficiency.

I have been taking biotin from some time now. My hair loss did stop (or at least return to the normal rate), although it could also be due to the fact that I reduced my Lamictal levels.

BTW, symptoms of a biotin deficiency include mild depression.

Last edited by Nakamova; 09-15-2011 at 02:09 PM.
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  #46  
Old 09-15-2011, 02:21 PM
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Anything thay wil stop the hair loss is all i want. Thanx for gettinh back to me.
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  #47  
Old 09-15-2011, 06:27 PM
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Logging onto www.puritanspride.com now. Looking for biotin. And here we go:
http://www.puritan.com/biotin-421?se...biotin&rdcnt=1

Thanks for bringing it up, crazychick. I'll let you know if I think it is making a difference. Will you do the same?
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  #48  
Old 09-16-2011, 08:12 AM
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yeah, not talking about taking vitamins for the epilepsy, but about taking them to try and counteract the side effects like liver support and silica for your hair etc but they didnt help, the meds must have been too strong!
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  #49  
Old 09-16-2011, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by kelly.hodges View Post:
yeah, not talking about taking vitamins for the epilepsy, but about taking them to try and counteract the side effects
Just remember that all supplements have their own side-effects as well.
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  #50  
Old 09-16-2011, 01:25 PM
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I will defo look into it epileric. Thanx
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  #51  
Old 09-16-2011, 01:28 PM
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Oh i dont think il take that then. I jus want.this sortin nw am sik of it.
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  #52  
Old 09-16-2011, 01:31 PM
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Sory endless not epileric.
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  #53  
Old 09-16-2011, 04:19 PM
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Biotin doesn't have any known side effects -- it's a B vitamin.
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Nakamova View Post:
Biotin doesn't have any known side effects -- it's a B vitamin.
The theory is that nothing can have an effect on just one part of the body.

An example would be anything that has a relaxing effect will probably increase dopamine. That would mean that cortisole, adrenaline & noradrenaline (the stress hormones) would lessen. That and actions it causes would be the side-effects which can have consequences.
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:25 PM
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Yes, well, EVERYTHING has side effects. But I don't want someone to be scared from taking a supplement just because "all supplements have side effects." (Obviously it's always a good idea to proceed with caution, tell your doctor, do your research, etc.)
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  #56  
Old 09-16-2011, 05:28 PM
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No reason to be scared but we do need to be aware of effects other than those we want and that even something as simple as suppressing stress hormones for too long can have negative effects.
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Last edited by epileric; 09-16-2011 at 05:31 PM.
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  #57  
Old 09-16-2011, 07:20 PM
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There are some vitamins to be super cautious about. It doesn't mean don't take them. It just means to take care not to overdose.

Vitamin A can cause intracranial hypertension, among other things. It's not what caused mine, but it can cause it. Serious disease. You don't want it.

Here's the "other things": http://eyes.emedtv.com/vitamin-a/vit...-overdose.html
I thought you might be particularly interested in these:
Quote :


High doses of vitamin A have been reported to cause some problems, such as:
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue or lethargy
  • Psychiatric problems that mimic severe depression
  • Psychiatric problems that mimic schizophrenia (such as hallucinations or paranoia)
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Delirium
Any fat soluable vitamin has the potential of overdose. So ask your doctor, and follow their directions.

Even vitamin B, which isn't water soluable, can cause a problem if you take way too much of it.

Quote :
Vitamin B complex overdose can cause vitamin B toxicity, depending on whether an overdose of niacin (B3), pyridoxine (B6) or folic acid (B9) has been taken.

The effects of hypervitaminosis B (the medical term for high levels of vitamin B in the body) depend on which member of the vitamin B complex is present in excess. Some B vitamins appear to cause no adverse effects when ingested in large quantities, whereas others can have harmful consequences.
Vitamin B Complex Functions

The eight nutrients that comprise the vitamin B complex have roles in cell growth and metabolism, DNA synthesis, nerve function and energy production. They are obtained from both plant and animal foods, except for vitamin B12 (cobalamin), which is found in animal foods only.



Three B vitamins can cause problems when taken in overdose. The adult recommended daily allowances (RDAs) for these vitamins are:
  • B3 (niacin) – RDA 16 milligrams per day (mg/day) for men and 14 mg/day for women; upper limit 35 mg/day
  • B6 (pyridoxine) – RDA 1.3 mg/day for both men and women; upper limit 100 mg/day
  • B9 (folic acid) – RDA 400 micrograms per day (μg/day) for both men and women; upper limit 1000 μg/day.
A regular intake of any of these vitamins above their upper limit can lead to symptoms of vitamin B toxicity.
Symptoms of Vitamin B Complex Overdose



Unlike vitamin A (which is stored in the liver when more is consumed than can be used), excess B vitamins are removed from the body in the urine. For this reason, vitamin B ingested in the diet is unlikely to have harmful effects, even when B-rich foods are eaten in large amounts. Vitamin B causes problems when too much is consumed in the form of dietary supplements.
  • The effects of niacin overdose include flushing and dry, itchy skin. Headaches, indigestion, liver damage and impaired vision have also been reported. These symptoms may occur as side-effects in people who have been prescribed niacin as a medication to prevent thickening of the walls of the arteries.
  • The main symptom of vitamin B6 overdose is numbness, tingling or pain in the fingers and toes. There are reports linking excessive B6 intake with painful sores on the skin and with birth defects, but there is not enough evidence to conclude that B6 was definitely the cause.
  • Taking too much vitamin B9 does not cause problems in itself, but high levels of folic acid can mask the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency is a progressive condition and a delay in its diagnosis can result in permanent damage to the nervous system. There is also evidence that excess vitamin B9 can worsen the effects of B12 deficiency.
Vitamin B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B7 (biotin) and B12 (cobalamin) have no demonstrated toxic effects.
Vitamin B Toxicity Treatment

In most cases, the effects of overdosing clear up when vitamin B intake is reduced to the RDA. However, the sensory problems caused by excess vitamin B6 can become irreversible if large overdoses have been taken over a long period of time.
http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?re...d=6015&page=R1

http://wendyamprosser.suite101.com/v...tamins-a314895



Be sure to ask your doctors what to take and how much! Your primary care physician, and your neurologist.
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  #58  
Old 09-17-2011, 01:26 AM
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Rebecca and I both take biotin. My research has taught me that biotin is part of the B Vitamin and is what helps to control yeast in the gut.
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  #59  
Old 09-17-2011, 04:20 AM
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Thanx every1. i dont know what to do now. Biotin dont seem to be working at all.
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  #60  
Old 09-17-2011, 04:23 AM
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Robin it doesnt seem to be working for me thats all.
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