Do you get a flu shot?

Do you get a flue shot

  • Yes, always (Always!)

    Votes: 22 45.8%
  • Try to, but not always (Nobodies perfect)

    Votes: 2 4.2%
  • Only when convenient (I don't bend for noth'n)

    Votes: 5 10.4%
  • Heck No (Don't be sticking me with government poison)

    Votes: 19 39.6%

  • Total voters
    48

no.guru

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I've actually never needed novocaine at the dentist! My few cavities haven't been deep enough.
I'm in favor of taking as few meds as possible, too, as a personal choice. I see the flu vaccine the same way, although it is contagious.

With pain, some have higher or lower thresholds so what may seem like too much or too little to me is relative.

As for no novocaine, although you did have to qualify it a bit, color me impressed.
 

Cint

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No doubt, I'm lucky to have decent health in general, and this has made it easier for me to take that personal stance.

As far as vaccines go, I'm all for them. I'm well aware of what's happening in areas where the child vaccine rate has dropped and whooping cough cases have soared, due to misinformation and unfounded fears about safety. I'm not interested in the flu vaccine because I'm not in a recommended category -- I'm not elderly or immuno-compromised, I don't work with children or in a health care setting. I work at home and my exposure to pathogens is limited.
:agree: You are lucky. But what will you do when you become an elderly? :ponder:

I never worked in the health care industry, but I did raise two children, one with a bad case of asthma while growing up, so his immune was also compromised, as mine is. He often caught the flu from other kids at school and would bring it home. It would be just the two of us, out of 4, who ended up with the flu without the flu shot.
 
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The Army makes us unless we have a legitimate medical reason not to get it... I think I'll have an excuse not to do it this year. Well, I didn't get the shot, but the mist. A lot of people just blow it out their nose after they get it...
 
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I guess I should say I never want it because I have always thought it doesn't help much... I've been stuck with enough stuff I'd rather avoid what I can. I wonder if my Anthrax shots had anything to do with my increased seizures... who is to say I guess.
 

Nakamova

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You are lucky. But what will you do when you become an elderly?
I'll let you know when I get there! I just turned 48, so I know that AARP will be knocking on my door soon...
 

CathyAnn31

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I don't really care one way or the other. If a nurse walked up, supplies in hand (lol) and offered then I probably would. I won't go seek one out though.

A decade ago hubby and both kids got the flu and I was spared. Having to take care of everyone was hard. I remember what a nice break it was, going to the drug store for more theraflu, even if I was only gone 10 mins. :p

Now I do need to go get a chicken pox vaccine since I've never had it. My titers were checked while pregnant and I had no antibodies. It's a 2 part vaccine. I never went back for the 2nd one. Gotta start all over again.
 

Cint

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According to the CDC, cases of whooping cough are on the rise, due to parents opting out of flu shots.

Whooping cough on the rise
A disease that was once nearly eliminated in the United States is making a big comeback.

More than 18,000 cases of pertussis-- or whooping cough-- have been reported in 2012 to the Centers for Disease Control.

This year is on its way to being the worst in nearly 50 years.

Here in Mesa County, the health department has seen an increase in whooping cough cases over the last five years. There were six confirmed cases last year, and so far in 2012, nine have been seen.

“It can start with cold-like symptoms: with a runny nose, a slight fever up to 102. You can also sometimes have diarrhea," said Dr. Charles Nowak, a family practice physician.

But can quickly grow into something much more serious.

"The age of greatest concern is in infants and young children because it can cause some permanent disability and/or death," said Nowak.

Whooping cough is named for the whoop sound between coughs when the patient is gasping for air.

"Infants get the immunizations at 2, 4 and 6 months, and then again between 15 and 18 months, 4 to 6 years of age," said Nowak.
In another article:

In most cases, fears among parents over vaccines -- many of them unfounded -- may be at play.

"The CDC and health departments are doing a good job of increasing vaccine coverage," Omer said. "Therefore, rates of vaccine-preventable disease are going down substantially. Parents aren't seeing the actual diseases, so when they hear about real or perceived adverse effects of vaccines, their perception of the risks versus benefits is shifted."

Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University, agreed.
"Parents are just more skeptical about benefits of vaccines," he said. "Most young parents today have never seen a case of polio or measles, and they didn't learn about the seriousness of these diseases and importance of the vaccinations in school."

Schaffner added that he finds it interesting that some states do not allow exemptions while others "really oblige parents wishing to opt out."

Past research has shown, though, that in states with a substantial proportion of unimmunized or incompletely immunized children, many kids are susceptible to these classic diseases. A 2006 study showed a 50 percent higher incidence of pertussis -- commonly known as whooping cough -- in states where it is easier to get exemptions. There have been similar findings with respect to measles.

Schaffner said he is very concerned that unvaccinated children who go abroad will bring back diseases, such as measles, that are still a major problem in other parts of the world. Not only will they suffer, but they will spread the illnesses to children who are unable to be vaccinated for medical reasons.

Schaffner said that part of the solution to the problem is that "states with easier process need to tighten up." However, he said, this is not a fool-proof approach. He said some research has shown an increase in medical exemptions in states that have tightened up their policies -- suggesting that parents are pressuring doctors to give medical exemptions. He encourages doctor to not let themselves be "brow-beaten into providing dubious excuses."
 

Abynorml

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havent had a flu shot since i was 11 years old and a flushot actually made me sick enough to be hospitalized, in 24 years I think ive gotten the flu 3 times, if that.
 

cazzy

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In the UK (at least the part i live in, i'm not sure about other counties) you only get a flu shot if you're invited by your doctor. It's normally given to children, the elderly and people who have life long conditions or work in healthcare etc.

Unfortunately Epilepsy isn't included in this and even though i've worked in health and social care for the last four years i haven't qualified to get it.

Mind you i think i've only ever had flu once and that was years ago.
can get it done in certain boots chemists
 

RobinN

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Never have and absolutely never will.
Vitamin D has helped to keep me healthy
 

Janus

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I just fear the actual ingredients lists of those vaccines. There is a real threat and Doctors who will not do it to there kids. Most just do what they do for the extra bonus from the pharmaceutical industry. When a doc says, its no problem just let me do this to you or your kid, ask them who is paying them. The long term studies are coming out now that are really frightening. I know there is stuff in my meds we don't know much about and I will not take other things that I know the industry makes sure is not publicized. I voted on the "no way" option. Does that sound extreme ?
 

RobinN

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Do research to see if the shot actually targets the whooping cough strain being seen. Actually if the vaccination worked the only people affected would be those unvaccinated. They have given their consent to take the risk. I just don't understand the concern.
 

cazzy

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my son and daughterinlaw both doctors one has the shot with well thought out reasoning and the other dont again with well thoughtout reasons,so pays ya money takes ya choise as they say
 

summerf

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Oh yes, I will be getting the flu shot. I signed up my 3 children for the flu shot clinic at their pediatrician's office this next weekend. All 3 of my kids were preemies and all of them have asthma. Just in case their flu shots don't work, I am getting a flu shot too. I don't want to bring the flu home to them. And not to mention, the last time I got the flu, I was sick for 3 weeks and it ended in pneumonia. No thanks, I don't want to do that EVER again. I work full time at a demanding job and my munchkins need a lot of attention. I don't have time to get sick! :)
 

summerf

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Never have and absolutely never will.
Vitamin D has helped to keep me healthy
RobinN, I've been taking vitamin D supplements because I found out that I am deficient. I haven't gotten sick since I started taking it about 3 months ago. I'm hoping that I'll avoid being sick all winter!
 

Efather

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Robin, thank again share information, it was nice take to U on the phone . I wll continue GFCF diet.
 

RobinN

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Sommer have you considered the possibility that the asthma is caused by dairy sensitivities
 
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