Do you have depression with your Epilepsy, if yes, which one?

Do you have depression with your Epilepsy, if so, which one?

  • Flat Feeling Depression

    Votes: 7 28.0%
  • Clinical Depression

    Votes: 8 32.0%
  • Medicine induced Depression

    Votes: 4 16.0%
  • Bipolar

    Votes: 2 8.0%
  • Bipolar II

    Votes: 1 4.0%
  • Mania

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 3 12.0%

  • Total voters
    25
  • Poll closed .
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I do get depressed when I have my myoclonic seizures. But now that the sun is out I am walking a lot more, I have been very busy and in a really good relation ship. For now I am not on any anti-depressants. They were making me depressed and it's one less med. But I have been the queen of depression at times.
 
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Factoid: One study stated that 80% of the patients with epilepsy were also diagnosed as having a depressive disorder. Upwards of 60% of these individuals had a history of significant episodes of depression. And 10-32% experience symptoms of anxiety.

And for those whose epilepsy cannot be controlled by meds, the likelihood of depression and anxiety are even greater. (Duh.)

Plus, many of the meds used to treat seizure disorders can trigger depression. Dilantin, Phenobarbatol, Celonton and Tegretol are all notorious for this side effect.

I know that when I was on Dilantin, it was the pits. I was at the very bottom of the barrel.
 
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Not to invoke self pity, but living with this disorder 24/7 is kind of hard, even without a seizure or chemical imbalance. I'm always popping pills, counting the next 'batch' of pills and watching the clock for the next dosage. Then, there's the fun side of multitasking this with a job, family, or some other responsibility.

With stress as a seizure inducer, it's hard to not worry about a seizure during personal trauma. However, I've also put exercise into my regular schedule faithfully because 'I'm worth it'. Trust me. Exercise DOES help get rid of stress.
 
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While some medical literature in the past reported that seizures could be induced by exercise, there are also more recent reports that exercise can be beneficial to those with epilepsy.

Many people with epilepsy, especially those with uncontrolled seizures, live a sedentary life and have low physical fitness. Regular physical exercise may have a moderate seizure preventive effect in 30-40% of the patient population, while in about 10%, strenuous exercise may provoke seizures.

Clinical and experimental studies have analyzed the effect of physical exercise on epilepsy. Although there are rare cases of exercise-induced seizures, studies have shown that physical activity can decrease seizure frequency, as well as lead to improved cardiovascular and psychological health in people with epilepsy.

Exercise, especially aerobic exercise, clearly benefits people with epilepsy because it often reduces seizure frequency, relieves depression, reduces social isolation, and promotes cardiac and general health.

In one study, 14 women completed a 3-month prospective exercise program and reported a significant reduction in seizure frequency during the period in which they exercised. In another prospective study, 26 children with intractable epilepsy underwent video-EEG monitoring during exercise and more than half showed a significant improvement in their EEG activity. A survey of 74 patients with epilepsy reported that those who exercised had significantly fewer seizures.

Research has found that most people with epilepsy experience improved electroencephalograph (EEG) readings during and after exercise. The reasons for this are unknown, but theories include:

The heavy breathing associated with exercise stops the build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood…

Reduction and management of stress…

Increase of ‘feel good’ brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) may calm the brain…

Concentration may focus the brain so that seizures are less likely…

I’ve been walking 3 miles a day for 20 years. I find it energizing and calming at the same time. Sometimes, I use “heavy hands” which start at one pound each. When I was younger, I was up to 5 pounds in each hand, but age has caught up with me, I’m sad to say.

Other things you can try are: jazzercise (although it makes me a little dizzy), ballet, if you just stick to the exercise part and don’t go twirling around the floor (I take private lessons), aerobics, use of a recumbent exercise bicycle, Pilates, yoga, and light weight bearing exercises...

I guess that's why your moniker is "Alivenwell!" :)
 
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