Is this absence?

scottsw

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My 22 month year old has had several staring spells where he seems unresponsive. He is almost always sitting in his high chair eating. He stares down like he's looking at his hand for several minutes. You call his name and he doesn't respond. Usually when it's over he lets out a brief cry. This happened on Christmas and he appeared to have several that day. We ran EEG tests for several days at home but it was all normal. They seem to have disappeared up until this morning where it appeared that he had an unusually long episode lasting about 10 minutes. However, he did have some movement. Looked up a few times and when we rubbed his chin to try and get him to look at us he smiled. He smiled again when we lifted his arm. He is learning and behaving well, like a normal 22 month old otherwise. Once the EEG results came back the neurologist and our pediatrician both said not to worry and just keep an eye on him. I'm not sure if it's absence but when he has these spells it's definitely abnormal. Any feedback would be appreciated.
 

Nakamova

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Hi scottsw,

Absence seizures are usually pretty brief (less than 20 seconds), so one lasting ten minutes would be unusual. If your son's responsive to you during an episode, that also seems different than in a typical absence seizure. It might be a good idea to videotape him when an episode occurs, so the neurologist can see what's happening.

Just a thought: Sometimes seizures can be secondarily triggered by food sensitivities or allergies. Since the episodes tend to occur when your son is eating, any chance that that may be a factor? Some kids with absence seizures are sensitive to things like dairy or gluten, and their seizures improve when adjustments are made to their diet.
 

scottsw

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Hi scottsw,

Absence seizures are usually pretty brief (less than 20 seconds), so one lasting ten minutes would be unusual. If your son's responsive to you during an episode, that also seems different than in a typical absence seizure. It might be a good idea to videotape him when an episode occurs, so the neurologist can see what's happening.

Just a thought: Sometimes seizures can be secondarily triggered by food sensitivities or allergies. Since the episodes tend to occur when your son is eating, any chance that that may be a factor? Some kids with absence seizures are sensitive to things like dairy or gluten, and their seizures improve when adjustments are made to their diet.
Thanks Nakamova,

He was eating soy yogurt and grapes. He is allergic to dairy, eggs, nuts. We have video taped several of the episodes and plan to meet with a neurologist. I agree it must not be absence. Very strange. Thanks for the feedback!
 

AlohaBird

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Hi Scottsw,
You might want to check out the website of Dr. John Symes (dogtorj.com). He has some very interesting information on food allergies and sensitivities. The soy may be the rub there. A lot of people replace dairy with soy because of lactose intolerance but soy is really high in glutamate (like the G in MSG, a known seizure trigger).
I make my own coconut yoghurt. It's delicious.
 
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