Chronic brain infarct

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Since I am new to this, I am wondering of any of you can explain what a "chronic brain infarct" is? My MRI report indicated that I have one and that I have no mass or mass effect which I guess is good news. My eeg showed abnormal activity. I am now awaiting an appointment with a neurologist to see what it all means as I have had a history of possible seizure-like episodes. I am 53 years old. Thanks for any help anyone can give me.
 
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Looks like it means you have an area of the brain that is surrounded by fluid (shouldn't be) but has been that way for years
 

brain

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Information on Chronic Acute Infarct in Brain

This one below is a quote:

Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is a chorioretinal disease that has been associated with multiple neurologic complications, including headaches, aseptic meningitis, transient ischemic attacks, and stroke.1 The case presented in this article is unique not only because APMPPE is a rare entity, but also because it is unusual for these patients to develop ischemic brain infarcts and even more unusual to depict them on the acute stage on MR imaging of the brain, especially when the infarcts are clinically silent, as in our case. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, the neuroimaging findings of APMPPE have not been reported in the radiologic literature.

And below is a PDF File from the American
Heart Association in regards to Stroke (which
can cause Seizures / Epilepsy) - Chronic Acute
Infarct:

AHA JOURNALS - REPRINT (PDF FILE)

You can also click on HEADSTORMS RESOURCE
link below - and I have a link there BRAIN ATTACK
alongside with the American Heart Association if
you scroll down (yes, Neurology and Cardiology
do work together because circulation and nervous
system do cause medical problems in the brain),
where you can be directed to a website with even
more information, including Neurological as well.

Hope this all helps you and be of benefit as well
as the Epilepsy Foundation.

This is very serious matter and please work very
closely with your Doctors!

(((((((( hugs ))))))))

:rose: :rose: :rose:
 
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Wow. I did not know it was called that. So this is what I had. Years ago. And you know this but is this what it's called?RTL, then for one year no seizures, then strokes and status for hours one year later which put me into an induced coma. Caused found out later , B-cells in the brain. Thought it was cancer but in short I still have some fluid left, lots of spinal tests and the infection left with meds. Sort of how the story goes.
 

Bernard

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The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (cerebral infarction), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (brain stem infarctions), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.
A brain infarction is an area of injury in brain tissue that usually occurs when the blood supply to that area is interrupted, depriving neurons of essential oxygen and glucose and causing vital circuits to die. Although major strokes have obvious consequences, small ones may go undetected clinically.
http://www.websters-dictionary-online.org/definition/BRAIN+INFARCTION

Sounds like there is a chronic problem with blood/oxygen flow to your brain.
 
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