Friend had a seizure...

XxBlaqkxX

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So, my husband have been good friends with this other guy and lately, he hasn't been making some good decisions about the types of crowds he is deciding to hang around or the friendships he's picking up. We haven't talked to him as much as we've been able to because of illness and he's been busy, and perhaps at times not responding to us as much as he used to as we disagree with his lifestyle choices at this time. While we're still friends, after talking to him recently, we learned that after he did something he told himself he'd never do, he had a seizure right then not but a few weeks ago, around his birthday. He told me he had a seizure many years ago when he was much younger, but it never happened again and I was glad for him that it seemed to be a one-time thing and wasn't a major factor in his life. We offered him the name of a good neurologist if he needs it, but he doesn't seem to keen about seeking help at this point. Of course that means his driving license might be in jeopardy and he might not be able to get to work and such so I wonder if that's a core motive. If he had one when he was younger, and he had one again, I'm thinking there could be a definite trigger that's not so often occurring, but my fear is if these start picking up speed and he starts having them more frequently (so hoping this isn't the case for him).

It's kind of hard, though, to sit around and not listen to us so much and not take this as seriously as maybe he perhaps should? I don't know, I just worry about him getting into a potential worse situation if he's not willing to get this addressed.
 

Porkette

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Hi XxBlaqkxX,

I'm sorry to hear about your friend having a seizure and not wanting to see a neuro. I don't know how old your friend is but if your
friend is old enough to be going through his change in life that can sometimes cause seizures to start up again. Another thing is if your
friend is using a cell phone or around other people using cell phones maybe he's cell phone sensitive like I am and the frequency triggers
seizures for him.

You need to tell your friend or some of his family that if he doesn't see a neuro that there's a chance that he could start having more
seizure and nobody wants that to happen. Tell your friend to start taking vitamin B12 once a day at least that will help a little.

Wishing you, your and your friend only the best of luck and May God Bless All of You!

Sue
 

Nakamova

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It's hard when someone doesn't want treatment. I hope he doesn't have another seizure. And I hope you can see his way to taking a good long look at his overall lifestyle choices and general health — that can go a long way to avoiding triggers.
 

XxBlaqkxX

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Hi XxBlaqkxX,

I'm sorry to hear about your friend having a seizure and not wanting to see a neuro. I don't know how old your friend is but if your
friend is old enough to be going through his change in life that can sometimes cause seizures to start up again. Another thing is if your
friend is using a cell phone or around other people using cell phones maybe he's cell phone sensitive like I am and the frequency triggers
seizures for him.

You need to tell your friend or some of his family that if he doesn't see a neuro that there's a chance that he could start having more
seizure and nobody wants that to happen. Tell your friend to start taking vitamin B12 once a day at least that will help a little.

Wishing you, your and your friend only the best of luck and May God Bless All of You!

Sue
At this point, I suppose it's hard to know triggers since they haven't had seizures as often, but one many many years ago and then one a few weeks ago. He thought it might've been his blood sugar dropping too low because he hadn't eaten much that day and while that can happen, he doesn't have any type of blood sugar issue that he is aware of. He has had an awful lot of stress lately, though, so that can mess with everything. He may not be wrong on that.

His place of work gets highly populated and where he was at during the time of the seizure is also a place where there might be many people. Cell phone triggers are possible anywhere these days, I guess - considering how there are towers and everywhere, too, and they have been updating them to get away from 3G, which is bad news for a lot of people that are sensitive to them.

I know when we were able to talk to him, we encouraged him to get medical help because it can put him in a potentially dangerous situation. He works with equipment that could be considered dangerous if he were to fall, where he had his seizure was in a place where there are often sharp/pointed objects, which isn't a good situation. He's looking into another job, but he's gotta pay his rent so he can't give it up this second.

We told him what kind of things help people - the different supplements and such that could be useful, but he's at this point that he hasn't been listening to whatever advice we give him. I think he's at a point where he's shutting everyone out because he's making decisions that he knows aren't the best decisions right now, but is trying to hide that and he hasn't been listening to advice, either. He's kinda navigating this thing as he see's fit, but I'm thinking that could be dangerous in the long run if he has more problems.

Hopefully he will listen at some point...
 

XxBlaqkxX

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It's hard when someone doesn't want treatment. I hope he doesn't have another seizure. And I hope you can see his way to taking a good long look at his overall lifestyle choices and general health — that can go a long way to avoiding triggers.
Hopefully it won't be a long standing problem for him in the long run because if it gets worse, work will be more difficult to do. Although, with the holidays his job is incredibly busy and others have been out sick so he's been working an awful lot of hours and that stress or little sleep could be an issue, too.

While he's not exactly listening to us, I hope he does end up taking some advice to heart and seeks some help, especially if this becomes a big problem.
 
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