One week Gluten Free.

Howll

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So, last week I started reading up the links between gluten and epilepsy. I've never been tested for a gluten intolerance/celiac but have been wondering for a while if I may have an intolerance because a lot of the symptoms present themselves in me.

So after a week, I must say I actually think it's having a positive effect. I get daily visual disturbances that nobody seems to know what they are, but they have actually reduced noticeably since starting this diet. The gastric symptoms have subsided and I actually feel like I have a clearer mind.

After two weeks I'm going to go to my doctors with what I've found and go through any tests to see if there's any intolerance there.
 
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That's great to hear!
At the beginning of the year I did a five week gluten free diet (I did cheat the first two weeks and ate gluten three times, the withdrawl was terrible). I didn't notice a seizure reduction, but I did feel cleaner and didn't crave as much food or snack at all. I stopped craving bready (okay that is not a word) foods and rarely eat bread or gluten now for that matter unless something is breaded or I want a dessert, which I don't eat often.
I'm glad you found a diet that works for your health. Eating habits (diet sounds so restrictive and I think of kale and carrots when I hear "diet") really can change your health for the better. :)
 

Nakamova

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Often it can take several months before a diet shows results in terms of seizure control, so it's great that it seems to be paying dividends already. If you can, keep a detailed journal for the next few months so you can monitor your progress.
 

Howll

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Often it can take several months before a diet shows results in terms of seizure control, so it's great that it seems to be paying dividends already. If you can, keep a detailed journal for the next few months so you can monitor your progress.

Yeah, I'm definitely keeping a note of anything I've noticed. I'm not saying after a week everything's gone, because it hasn't, but I thought since I couldn't get an appointment for two weeks it's worth getting a head start because then at least I've got something to go to the appointment with so they may take me more seriously.

Stronger - the snacking thing is what I've noticed the biggest change in, I actually feel fuller for longer. I'm not eating amazingly well, I'm still finding some gluten free goodies (Daim bar caramel almondy cake is amazing) but overall I just feel less bloated and sluggish, my reflux is nowhere near as bad and I feel more energetic!

The visual disturbances haven't gone completely, just the amount of them has noticeably cut down, so I'm all for carrying on to see if it keeps on helping. I know the whole gluten free thing is controversial, but it's gotta be one of the least invasive treatments you could try, and I'm up for trying anything that's not medication haha.
 

masterjen

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One has to be actively and currently eating gluten before undergoing the tests for celiac disease. And not just a bit of gluten but a lot. The fact that you have already shown symptom improvement would suggest that if you do in fact have celiac disease that the tests my yield false negative results. As for gluten intolerance, tests may or may not yield abnormalities when someone is currently eating gluten but again one has to be currently eating a lot of gluten.

Having celiac disease puts a person at greater risk of several other conditions and doctors can monitor patients with celiac disease for signs of these conditions in their very early stages. That's why it is so important to undergo the testing. The first test is a blood test looking for a specific antibody, and if that antibody is present then an endoscopy is done to look at the status of the upper intestinal villi.
 

Howll

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I was thinking more along the lines of a gluten intolerance rather than Celiac disease, although I would get tested for both. I know what the test entails, this 2 week period is purely for my own curiosity and because I can't get the appointment for two weeks, I'm impatient. It can't do any harm for a couple of weeks. I obviously want to get the doctors advice before doing anything long term, and of course will go back to eating gluten rich foods for the testing period. It would be handy if I could tell my doctor WHY I want the appointment so they could advise me on what I needed to do beforehand, but alas I can't do that so have to waste time by going for an initial appointment then booking the tests at a later date.
 

Zoe

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Hello Howll,

I hope you will keep seeing improvement in your seizures with a gluten free diet. You can be intolerant to gluten withough having an allergy to wheat, or a lot of physical symptoms.
The gluten (and dairy!) free diet was a major factor in getting my seizures to stop after brain surgery failed. I went on a gluten free diet in 1996 and have been seizure free since 1998. Have you looked at much of the research on how gluten intolerance can be linked to seizures and other neurological disorders? A few weeks may not be enough time to see any lasting changes in your seizures. Good luck with the diet and with your appointment.
 
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I'm not eating amazingly well, I'm still finding some gluten free goodies (Daim bar caramel almondy cake is amazing) but overall I just feel less bloated and sluggish, my reflux is nowhere near as bad and I feel more energetic.
I had to google the Daim bar but it looks delicious! This may sound cliché but have you tried Pinterest for the gluten free recipes? There are a LOT of recipes and tips on there.
 

Blonde Angel

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Don't underestimate the dietician, they are trained in providing professional support in nutrition.

We still keep in contact with the dietician and medical nutritionist.
 
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