When to administer Diastat

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I've heard varying information about when to prescribe Diastat. Our doctor left us the option to administer the medication immediately. Other literature I've read suggests 5 minutes. Is there a right or wrong amount of time to wait before giving it?
 

Maisy

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That would depend upon the person if you knew R
The person gad very prolonged seizures I.mediately or if you know they always cluster but if its a general seize id wait it put and see only you know really and your doc your best off following your doc :)
 
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Maisy, thanks for the response, and don't apologize for lousy auto-correction! :)

I'm going to talk to the doc about this on Wednesday. We were first prescribed Diastat by a general pediatric neurologist, but our current doc is an epilepsy specialist. The first doc recommended immediate administration, and I've mentioned that to several people who were surprised that he didn't tell us to wait 5 minutes. Regardless, I'm sure the new doc will clear away the confusion when we see him on Wednesday.
 

Maisy

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Personally it being a child I would go for immediately, I know rec is 5 min though (btw I did diastat training course few years back)
 
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Personally it being a child I would go for immediately, I know rec is 5 min though (btw I did diastat training course few years back)
Jake's teacher has also received Diastat training. Nearly half of her students are on some sort of seizure protocol. She will follow the doctor's order and give it immediately. Most of her students are on a 5-minute protocol.
 
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I was told by our neurologist for my 9- year old son to give it to him if he hasn't come out of it in 2 minutes.
 

jimj

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It depends on a lot of things like the patient, the caregiver, the neurologist, the patient's reaction to the rescue med, etc. But as a general rule of thumb, if there's a good chance the seizure will stop on its own then you'll usually want to wait a bit before administering a rescue med. Is that ambiguous enough for ya? :)

Since my daughter's seizures almost always go status and since she has minimal negatives side effects from midazolam, we give her intranasal midazolam immediately. You might also want to consider asking your neuro about replacing rectal Diastat with intranasal midazolam (Versed). That single change has improved my daughter's quality of life as much as anything else we've done.
 
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It depends on a lot of things like the patient, the caregiver, the neurologist, the patient's reaction to the rescue med, etc. But as a general rule of thumb, if there's a good chance the seizure will stop on its own then you'll usually want to wait a bit before administering a rescue med. Is that ambiguous enough for ya? :)
Sounds perfectly reasonable to me!
Since my daughter's seizures almost always go status and since she has minimal negatives side effects from midazolam, we give her intranasal midazolam immediately. You might also want to consider asking your neuro about replacing rectal Diastat with intranasal midazolam (Versed). That single change has improved my daughter's quality of life as much as anything else we've done.
Excellent. I'll talk to the neuro about the possiblity of switching at our next appointment. And I appreciate the advice!
 
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