Working and a Chipper Attitude

Matthew74

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I'm looking for jobs. What do you guys do with this sort of thing?

Job Announcement:

😀 FAST-PACED ENVIRONMENT. We are looking for cheerful, energetic, fun, interactive, super-special team players that are full of life, with an intense passion for customer service, and who love to connect with others. Sucessful candidates will be ready for any challenge, thrive on a FAST-PACED ENVIRONMENT, love multi-tasking, and be willing to go the extra mile to make people smile. FAST-PACED ENVIRONMENT. We need people who will work for nothing, to show up at any time of day, any day of the week, any day of the year, and at any location - with no advanced notice. Unlimited overtime is expected of ALL employees. Happy, Happy, Happy. Driver's license required. Minimum of 20 years experience in the exact position applied for required, degree and/or certification preferred (i.e. Dishwasher's Apprentice). Younger candidate preferred.
(I made that up.)

Pretty much all job announcements read something like this, which is basically everything I am NOT looking for in a job. On the one hand, it's a lot of nonsense, and can't be taken TOO seriously. On the other hand, I find that all this interaction, multi-tasking, and extra hours are a reality in the job market. They want a pep squad, not employees.
 

CathyAnn31

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Agreed. So true! I've been reading those ads lately. I wonder what the turn-over is like at those places. :LOL:
 

XxBlaqkxX

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A "pep squad." I feel like that sums this up perfectly. I commonly see that type of thing for customer service jobs. All I used to tell myself if I was in one was, "Fake it 'til you make it." Just gotta do you best, be kind to customers, and do the best you can. The driver's license thing, though....sometimes I wish some employers would be more clear as to why that's needed. Is it because you'll be driving as part of the job or are you asking it to be a pain and judge me because if I don't have a car I certainly won't show up, I guess? Even if I did have a few people that could give rides. Although, I do remember getting a job one time where a driver's license was required, but they really needed people. I then realized getting into the job we were going to people's houses and while I did have rides, it was a pain to do so. I would wait on a street corner a while for my ride or my usual ride sometimes couldn't take me and I needed to contact the back up and it got frustrating really quick. If I didn't get a ride, there would be no way I was getting to work on time at some of these places. I have had employers ask for driver's license, I give them ID, and they're like, "What's this?" Well, obviously - my ID. o_O Then they automatically judge even though it's at a brick and mortar - no driving on the job. It's really terrible...some people assume I have had DUI's or been involved in hit and runs or something because I can't drive. I've been laughed at going to the DMV for a permit being in my late 20s before...makes me wish I had "Trolley" from Mr. Roger's Neighborhood that magically shows up at my house and takes me anywhere I want to go - for some it's plain creepy, but for me it would be an absolute dream.
 

Matthew74

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Mr. Rodgers was a genius, if not a saint. He just had this way of speaking right to you, no matter what your age.

I often feel like the things I am worst at, are exactly what society values most. And, the things I am good at are what it values least. It leaves me stuck trying to be something I'm not all the time, and it doesn't go well. It's not really my fault, because if I had the choice I would do something that fit, but I don't have a choice. Customer service is pretty much the last thing I want to do, or should be doing. I'm just not suited. The only thing that helps is that I often see people who are A LOT worse at it than I am. I'm actually pretty good at being nice and all, but the constant interaction is too stressful.

The trolley thing is real. They used to have these "trolley neighborhoods" that had trolleys that came right to where people lived. They were developed especially as housing for commuters to go into the city. You can sometimes see them on a map. They usually have a central street that curves kind of gently somewhere, like it was made for a railroad, that points straight to an existing (or old) railway or station. They have streets with houses that branch off from either side. Del Ray in N. Virginia is one (near Alexandria). Another is Jamaica Plain outside of Boston. I lived in Jamaica Plain, and the tracks were still visible in places. They were both nice places to be. I don't know what people were thinking when they tore all those tracks out. I've pretty much given up trying to understand people. They'll do anything to make room for cars, no matter how much it costs, what it destroys, or how unlivable it makes the world. It doesn't work, because everybody starts driving and you have a traffic jam. Then they tear down a bunch of nice old buildings and make parking lots. I'm sure that some of these neighborhoods had MORE people living in them back in the day than they do now.

I'm going to start a separate post about driving.
 

XxBlaqkxX

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Mr. Rodgers was a genius, if not a saint. He just had this way of speaking right to you, no matter what your age.

I often feel like the things I am worst at, are exactly what society values most. And, the things I am good at are what it values least. It leaves me stuck trying to be something I'm not all the time, and it doesn't go well. It's not really my fault, because if I had the choice I would do something that fit, but I don't have a choice. Customer service is pretty much the last thing I want to do, or should be doing. I'm just not suited. The only thing that helps is that I often see people who are A LOT worse at it than I am. I'm actually pretty good at being nice and all, but the constant interaction is too stressful.

The trolley thing is real. They used to have these "trolley neighborhoods" that had trolleys that came right to where people lived. They were developed especially as housing for commuters to go into the city. You can sometimes see them on a map. They usually have a central street that curves kind of gently somewhere, like it was made for a railroad, that points straight to an existing (or old) railway or station. They have streets with houses that branch off from either side. Del Ray in N. Virginia is one (near Alexandria). Another is Jamaica Plain outside of Boston. I lived in Jamaica Plain, and the tracks were still visible in places. They were both nice places to be. I don't know what people were thinking when they tore all those tracks out. I've pretty much given up trying to understand people. They'll do anything to make room for cars, no matter how much it costs, what it destroys, or how unlivable it makes the world. It doesn't work, because everybody starts driving and you have a traffic jam. Then they tear down a bunch of nice old buildings and make parking lots. I'm sure that some of these neighborhoods had MORE people living in them back in the day than they do now.

I'm going to start a separate post about driving.
Wow! Didn't know the trolley thing was real. That would be amazing. I've seen street trolleys and such, but I've only seen ones for touring towns, not for commuting.

It's incredibly difficult to live in this world without a car. I've seriously thought of one day investing into a horse or a camel that I could ride into town (legally, of course), but that's expensive, we'd have to have more land, it can be more expensive than a car, and not to mention - you'd have to be riding an animal that isn't afraid of traffic on the sides of the road (that's a big challenge, too).

I don't care for customer service, either. I know I'm good at it, but it is stressful and I'd rather not be in it, honestly.
 
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