Medic Alert Jewellry

angie2312

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Hi all

Just wondered how many people wore these ??

Am in the process of being diagnosed at present . But have chosen only to tell the people who matter what is going on with me . Just wondered if the medic alert jewellry is important and if everyone wears it as I think people will notice it and start asking questions - Any advice ??

:ponder:

Thanks
 

Melpier

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the people you are around on a regular basis are the main people that need to know. I have a medic bracelet but do not wear it then again I have delt with it my whole life and everyone knows about it. I would definitly sit down with my supervisor and make sure they know how to deal with it and also makesure your co-workers know how to deal with it. it could be something you supervisor brings up in a meeting or something you deal with you self.
 

dfwtexas

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Hi Angie,
I got diagnosed last year at age 47. I went thru the grieving process in dealing with that. My denial kept me from being honest and dealing with being prepared for an emergency. I have learned to be more open with others, but I do pick and choose who I tell. That link is good, it was what convinced me to get medic alert. I found a great anklet bracelet (it is small crosses linked together) that has a medic alert. Everyone that knows me knows of my regelious belief and I thought that would be the least noticeable. I have never had anyone asked about the medic alert...and I have had many compliment me on it! One such person was a good friend and she was suprised when I told her what it really was! There are many different types of alert jewerly and you can pick something that is YOU
My medic alert just has word SEIZURE and my emergency contact name and number. I have not been in a situation where it was needed...but it is my safety net. Also, if you have cell phone, be sure to add ICE (in case of emergency number)...i have a son that works with police and he said they look for ICE numbers in cell phone if there is an emergency
jenn
 

Cint

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the people you are around on a regular basis are the main people that need to know. I have a medic bracelet but do not wear it then again I have delt with it my whole life and everyone knows about it. I would definitly sit down with my supervisor and make sure they know how to deal with it and also makesure your co-workers know how to deal with it. it could be something you supervisor brings up in a meeting or something you deal with you self.
But what if you or Angie have a break-through seizure when you're out of your "normal" surroundings? Will people know what is going on and what to do?

I've worn a Medic Alert bracelet for years, just to be safe. It has the # to call plus I have a Medic Alert card I carry with me in my wallet with the names of docs, medications, etc. If and when an emergency arises and they call the #on the bracelet, that same info will be made available to those in charge.
 

lennie

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Hi:

My adult son has a bracelet that directs whoever reads it to find info in his wallet. (Not go to hospital etc. as per his personal wishes). But you could maybe find a necklace style and slip it under your top and thus not obvious.

Good luck. :)
 

ADK

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I don't want to rant but this has been my experience about Medic alert.

I wore a Medic Alert for years. I seized and according to my family the EMT's never looked at it or even opened my wallet.

I had a seizure last saturday. It involved rescue and Police. Family told the EMT's and Police that I had E. Well, according to family the first responders never asked for who was treating me or what my med's were. Everything was back to normal at the ER.

I would suggest to wear a Medic Alert something or other, but what I have experienced is ignorance about E. It appears that first responders in rural areas don't get it.
 

lennie

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Hi:

your experience with medic alert bracelets etc does not surprise me. My son has had several experiences where they load him onto ambulence even with him saying no, I don't want to go. Frankly he cannot afford the medical bills. I think they administered anti-seizure drugs without his vote. It could be they have a protocol to follow. We live in a rural area. :dontknow:
 

knothing

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I remember the EMT from my first tonic-clonic and him going by the book. He gave me oxygen and the (being November) was cold. It made real sick to my stomach and when I took it off the nausia would go away. He tried to force me to take it and when I tried to explain how sick it made me he did not care. I did get him to stop but it was out of the threat to put the oxygen tank in an uncomfortable position on his person.
It is a shame it had to come to that and my new boss informed me that against my wishes he may still call paramedics to which I stated you call them then the company picks up the bill because it is against my wishes unless of course I have been hurt bad enough. I have been debating getting a medic alert braclet for when I am out without people who know what to do. Has anyone had a good experience with these? So far it does not sound that positive or worth the hassle.
 

dfwtexas

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Well, no guarantee it will help, but I think of it of one more way to be pro-active in letting someone know in case of emergency
 

Crystal11

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I definatly ware a Medic-Alert bracelet and have several really nice necklaces I use. Depending on what I ware or whatever I always have one on. I am deafblind and have complex partial seizures and not everyone knows what they are. So its always better to have one on you. I went to ER in postictal state and I don't think they checked it but they did see it. Normally they would look for one even more if your totally unconscious and they need to get a hold of someone if you're alone. Even if they have not checked it before, its still a good idea to ware one.
My file has all of my doctors on it as well as primary contact (Several of them), all of my meds and dosages and info about my guide dog just in case something happenes and I cannot manage him. He is microchiped too.
On my bracelet or necklace they both have my main conditions and that I take medication, then ID numbers and phone number for Medic Alert Foundation is on there.

As far as the public is concerned, some might as about it- but most people don't. They understand you have some form of medical condition. There are lots of people who have medical id.

I think its a great investment.
Take care everyone.
 

Ruthie

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I wear a medic alert bracelet because I have a pacemaker, lots of drug allergies and several medical conditions.

EMT's tend not to notice or look for it. They sometimes notice it if they are trying to put an I.V. in and it's in their way. I get more nurses that notice it than anyone but it's usually true that they don't notice it until the crisis has passed. I've had some who notice it but still ask what my scar is from when they see where the pacer insertion site is--DUH???!!!!

Dr's seldom notice it or look for it.

I would hope that if I was unconscious more effort would be made on their part but you never know. My friends and people in the general public notice it more than healthcare workers ---isn't that scary!!

I've worn everything from the medic alert bracelets to necklaces to bracelets that aren't as obvious (like the kind Lauren's Hope sells). I now get my emblem from Medic alert but I make my own braclets out of my own beads. I also have medic alert card in my wallet and I also have the e-health key from medic alert on my keychain but that has really only come in handy for my use as it requires a password to get into and EMT's if they have a laptop won't know my password.
 

IMgood1

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I got a necklace in 1980 and have worn it since. It has saved my life more than once. I recommend it highly. I wore a bracelet for awhile and found it got in the way and went back to the necklace.
 

angie2312

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Thank you for the advice everyone . I will say after researching this jewellry it certainly seems a lot different to how I remember them and are just like normal jewellry . I am being stubborn and refuse to tell everyone as I know certain people will just use it as a way to gossip about me and I dont want that. My Mum is a superstar and I love her a lot - but i only have to go a little bit dreamy and she tries to jump to my rescue and make a fuss - Bless her - its very sweet really !!!

Thanks again for all your replies xxxx
 
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yes!

It is very helpful to have the jewlery! I wear mine everyday, i don't ever take it off.
 

Crystal11

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Crystal here- I forgot to mention the one main reason i chose to ware an medical id or medic alert id. One day in P.E. at the school for the blind, i started having a seizure- but my normal teacher was gone and had a substitute. This sub didnt understand I had seizures and slapped me as if I were slacking off and sleeping while sitting up. My friend who also has seizures told him that I was actually having a complex partial seizure and that I would be out of it for a while.. he called the health center and they read my ID and got my name, pulled my file and took good care of me. I advise to have your first name, and last name initial letter- just so you have some privacy on your full name. For those of us with complex partial seizures- you might point to your ID or take it off and give it to someone to help you out- in situations where you cannot speak- I have lots of trouble with that. I'm able to understand something happening but cannot talk. Usually afterwards is the worst.
Anyways- any medical condition that could lead to problems in communciation (fainting, Epilepsy/seizures, deafness, deaf-blindness etc).

Please take care everyone!
Crystal
 
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If you go to http://www.google.com/products?q=epilepsy+jewelry&show=li&sa=N&gnum=20
you'll find just about anything you can imagine -- charms, pins, necklaces, keepsake boxes, memory charms, earrings, anklets, support pins, etc -- an amazing array of selections all at different prices!

There are some very cool bracelets at http://peaceofmindjewelry.com/charit...eness_Bracelet where $10 of your purchase is donated to the Epilepsy Foundation.

http://www.birdsandbeadsjewelry.com/...-awareness.asp has beaded bracelets with charms and $5.00 of every purchase is donated to the American Epilepsy Outreach Foundation.

And http://www.etsy.com/search_results_s...query=epilepsy has very attractive beaded bracelets at a very reasonable price with 10% of the sales price donated to charity.

Plus, there's a beatiful (but pricey) epilepsy bracelet at http://www.mcphersonandcompany.com/c...pa-jewelry.ivx where $5.00 of every purchase will be donated to the Epilepsy Foundation of Central Pennsylvania.

And at the website http://www.fiddledeeids.com/ they have beaded medical alert bracelets, charms, you name it.

Maybe if the medical id bracelet looked like a pretty piece of jewelry, you wouldn't feel so self conscious wearing it.
 
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IMgood1

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I was diagnosed when I was a kid. I've been wearing a necklace since 1980. It has saved my life more than once now. If anyone were to ask me about it, I would say, "Certainly, it is important to have a medic alert tag of some kind".
I did wear a bracelet for awhile and found it got in the way and went back to my necklace.
 
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