Disability for Dummies?

Mr.21T

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I'm 24, a college graduate, and trying to move towards an independent life but it's difficult, not impossible to do it based on my e-friendly schedule. I work three part-time jobs, drive, and control my seizures, but I can't pay all my bills and meds without my parents' help.

I have a friend with epilepsy that is suggesting that I apply for disability to fill the gaps in my wages. He works part time and still receives help. I'm open to it, but I'm wondering if there's any negative to applying for someone who's lived "in secret" for some time and currently has no limitations on life besides precautionary measures to avoid complications with seizures. I've heard stories of government people watching people who collect disability and following them as they go to dance clubs, bowling, and other social events:roflmao:.

Currently, I work 25 hours a week at an insurance company, I'm a self-employed journalist that sub-contracts about $600 of work monthly from a local newspaper, and I'm also a self-employed insurance salesman for another insurance company and make about $100/month in commissions. After taxes that's almost $14,000 a year. I live in Florida, I'm on no other forms of assistance, and have no kids (that always seems to matter when it comes to free stuff:ponder:)

Would appreciate anyone that can help me gain understanding of what is and isn't available to me under my circumstances.
 
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AlohaBird

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Disability laws vary a lot from state to state so you probably should find out what the rules are specifically for Florida.

Do you pay for your own insurance? You might qualify for medicaid.

I hate to say it but if you work three jobs, have your seizures under control, and drive, you aren't really all that disabled. You are just not doing so well financially, something that is happening to a lot of people who don't have E.

The area I think you qualify for assistance in is anything medically related, insurance, your meds and other medical bills and such. I would look into Medicaid if I were you.
 

valeriedl

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I'm on social security. I get about the same amount of money that you are making right now. I'm not exactly sure how they figure out how much you can get a month. This probably varies from state to state. I'm not positive but I think you can have a job but if you make a certain amount of money then you will not be eligible for social security.

I also have Medicare which does help with my medical expenses, dr visits and prescriptions. I know if you make over a certain amount of money, probably varies from state to state, you are not eligible for it.
 

Mr.21T

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I hate to say it but if you work three jobs, have your seizures under control, and drive, you aren't really all that disabled. You are just not doing so well financially, something that is happening to a lot of people who don't have E.
That's what I'm thinking, lol. I'm certainly among the more able people with epilepsy, but since a breakthrough in November, I've averaged about a seizure a month, had a bunch of injuries and missed out on a lot of work. Toughing it out has been my primary goal.

I currently am under no assistance at all, so anything I qualify for would help me a lot. Especially food stamps. I'm also curious as to the various forms of assistance that people in this forum use to get by and improve their quality of life.
 

alivenwell

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Food is definitely a priority. We have a food bank in our area that delivers food to various locations. The 2nd priority is to find a method to bring down your stress to the point where it was prior to seizures. Exercise works wonders there.
Find the best neurologist in your area. Get your medications in order. Obamacare will really help you, especially with your low income to find medications. Insist on brand name medications. Generics have too much variation. A doctor can write a note for you to have no substitutions. Pre-count medications every day. Education is a good thing to have, too. Our area has a federal and state level vocational rehabilitation that can find appropriate employment or education. They may require tests like an eeg, too.
 

Matthew74

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I think the only way to figure out what you might qualify for is making an appointment at social services, or seeing a social worker at a hospital or somewhere. I would highly recommend avoiding social services if you can. The only thing social services did for me is get me on temporary food stamps. According to them I was "able-bodied". The people who did help me worked for the local hospital. They helped me get on medicaid. The department of rehabilitation has also helped by paying for my schooling.

It all varies according to your circumstances, your work history, and your state. Basically, if I were to get disability, I would probably get around $600 a month minus whatever subsidized housing I got. There is no way to live on that, and even if I could I can do better working part time.

You also are dealing with the reality that everything you do to try to improve your situation or be responsible counts against you. Young educated unmarried men who work and have no children are at the bottom of the list.

Right now I'm on Medicaid and get all my (very expensive) healthcare for free. I am so grateful for this, but I have no idea what is going to happen when I start work. I could loose it all and end up with nothing.

I just want to encourage you to remain independent. Even if it's rough, in the long run it will be easier. The reality is that the government doesn't care. People care.
 
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