Night Sweats - Sleep Apnea

Bernard

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:roflmao:

Re-read the beginning of this thread Robin... :paperbag:
 

RobinN

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I searched for a thread on sleep apnea, and found this one.
Would it have been better to start a new one?
I apologize if I put the info in the wrong place
 

Bernard

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No... I was referring to you asking Randy if he's been tested for sleep apnea. That's pretty much what started this thread...
 

RobinN

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This was an answer to a question on Newsmax Health:
Sleep apnea and hypothyroidism are distinctly different conditions. Uncontrolled hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) will aggravate and in some cases set the stage for sleep apnea by weight gain and its related obstruction of the upper airway.

Sleep apnea has no effect on hypothyroidism itself, but is a common associated condition as you have noticed. The failure to recognize both of these conditions will have major effects on your quality of life and longevity. Correction of hypothyroidism may give a measure of control, improvement or remission of sleep apnea.
 

Bernard

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Australian doctors have found a new link between epilepsy and obstructive sleep apnoea, a condition where patients stop breathing at night.

Professor Terry O'Brien from the Royal Melbourne Hospital says there has been some evidence from other studies that patients with epilepsy may have an increased incidence of sleep-disordered breathing.

Professor O'Brien says there are similar symptoms of daytime sleepiness and fatigue between the two conditions.

He says patients with epilepsy can gain weight as a result of their medications, something that increases their risk of sleep-disordered breathing.

"We put two and two together and thought we should look into this," he said.

Doctors recruited 87 patients with epilepsy and monitored them in a sleep unit.

They found 25 per cent had significant sleep-disordered breathing that was severe enough to require treatment.

In the general population, the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing is 3 to 7 per cent.
...
http://au.news.yahoo.com/latest/a/-/latest/17445284/doctors-find-epilesy-and-sleep-apnoea-link/

This study is slightly different from the one mentioned in post #15. They sampled a more general population of epilepsy patients here (and a larger sample too).
 

CandKiwi

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All very interesting. I'll have to check into sleep apnea & snoring. But I also am seeking info on Nocturia - getting up several times through the night to urinate. Anybody else? I've been on Epilim (Sodium Valproate) since around 1987
 

mylo

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i had sleep apnea, one of the most terrifying experiences. i used to wake up after a nightmare gasping for air, i felt like i was dying each time it happened. it took me about 5 minutes before i felt like i had enough oxygen in me to calm down again.

i actually used to confuse it for thirst for some reason so i'd wake up gasping and drink a big cup of water i'd keep by my bed. i feel like an idiot now. also, the daytime sleepiness it causes is hellish, i'd sleep through my classes all the time.

symptoms didn't really dissipate until i lost some weight.

all i can recommend for anyone suffering from this is to sleep on their side and DEFINITELY tell your doc about it because some AEDs such as benzo's and barbiturates can keep you from waking up to get some air.
 

valeriedl

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My husband does not have epilepsy but I know that he has sleep apnea. One of the reasons that we had to start sleeping in separate bedrooms is because he snores so bad that I couldn't sleep. I can hear him through the wall with the tv on right now. He won't take any sort of test or do anything about it, he's really stubborn!

If he's been snoring really bad at night he'll wake up in the morning not breathing good and it might last through part of the day too. As mylo said if he sleeps on his side the snoring isn't as bad and he usually doesn't have problems the next day.

I know you didn't ask about this but does any one have problems with night sweats? Mine started about two years ago and I didn't have any med changes or anything else happen that could have started it.

I used to be able to sleep in flannel PJs with 3 heavy blankets on me in the winter and in the summer I could still sleep with a heavy blanket on top of me, we didn't have air conditioning then.

Now winter or summer (we have AC now) I'll wake up covered in sweat and the blankets will be soaked sometimes. I'm not sleeping with much on me in the summer (maybe a sheet) or winter (maybe one blanket). I've started sleeping in just my undies (sorry if that's too much info) but it's not helping.

It's not every night this happens. I don't think that I'm dreaming or having seizures when they do. I asked my neuro about it and he really didn't say anything.
 
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