Epilepsy Drug Linked to Low IQ

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Do you teach children that are more severe/profound or children that are more moderate/mild?
 
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Well, I'll tell you what. I did not let the school do full assessments on my son because they were not or are not a full neurosyche test. Which includes emotion, behavior , disability, circumstances. Because in WA state they want me to pay for it and I have seen the tests. The Dr, has done them . Or neurosychologists. Then its done with somebody I know who knows my son and understands medically his disability.
 

skillefer

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Hi Rach! I work with some in both groups, but primarily mild/moderate. :) However, I have students that come to my class from the Severe classroom to help them broaden their school experience. And I have some students that we call 'tweeners'. They don't quite fit in the Severe/Profound classroom, and they're too low functioning for the average Mild/Moderate classroom. I've also worked with Emotionally Disturbed students...not a whole class, but one or two kids in an otherwise Mild/Moderate classroom. And I also work with kids that are GLD (Gifted and Learning Disabled) as well as students that qualify only due to Other Health Impairments such as hearing aids. Oh, and I also work with a student that is on a 504 plan. So I've pretty much worked with kids along the entire spectrum...including one with autism and one with asperger's. So as a teacher already in the classroom, never ever think that you'll only end up working with one type of student. There's a reason why Special Ed. teachers have to be jacks of all trades. :) I've taught every core subject in my 11 years.
 
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Wow- here there is actually two seperate degrees for special education one being the general curriculum track (students with mild/moderate disabilities) and the adapted track, which is what I am in which is children from profound to low moderate...So i guess you could say that it is more "specialized" if that makes any sense...If you have a degree to work with student in the mild/moderate range then you will most likely not be working with children in the severe/profound range...however someone in the adapted track would work with students in the severe/profound range, but also possibly with children that are a little more high functioning (typically when these children are brought into the classroom as "helpers") Personally I like working the most with the children on functional academics so these would be children in the low moderate to severe range. Always neat to talk to another special education major or a special education teacher!!! :banana:
 

skillefer

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I love hearing from other SpEd teachers too. :) As for my degree, it was a Master's degree for Special Ed, grades K-12. Where I graduated from, at that time, there was no distinction for those teachers working mild/moderate, severe/profound, ED or anything. Instead, we were taught to deal with each of the major areas. Looking at some of the teachers coming out, I think my training was much better. And, sometimes for job security, it's good to be able to be flexible. Now, I teach in California, and here I am considered a mild/moderate instructor, and am credentialed for Mild/Moderate. But as you will quickly learn, what you're credentialed for, and what you end up doing are sometimes different things. Also, as districts face budget cuts (like here in Cali.) they will try to cut wherever they can. SpEd may be federally mandated, but resources like aids for the classroom can be cut. (Or at least that's what the districts think.) Also, for districts with small SpEd populations, they may consider cutting the cost of the teacher by busing the SpEd students to other nearby districts. Don't know how things are in Texas, but here, things are tight. Districts are handing out pink slips in March just to have enough money to make it through the school year.
 

Aodan

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Hi Eeyore,
Gotta love the name girlfrend!! But you do have to stop worrying...my 89yr old mother always told me "you're going to worry yourself sick child". I ended up with Fibromyalgia an autoimmune disease that can be brought on by stress. Mothers are always right :).
Listen to your doctor, but remember you know your body best. If something about a med doesn't feel right or you have a question and your dr seems to brush it off or says "you're fine"-find another dr. Dr.s these days have way too many patients, too little time, too much money, malpractice insurance, and MOST of them DON"T have or have had serious medical conditions themselves. We all know most Neurologist think themselves "gods". I even found a wonderful neurosurgeon for my son who joked about the neourologist "god" complex. He was very cool.
If you're on Depakote its probably the worst one to be on. There's loads of studies that document this, on this website alone. There are many choices these days. Stress can cause miscarriages, but so can Depakote. It can also cause eptopic pregnancies. Let alone the problems to the fetus. Faith in god or Jesus, isn't going to help your seizures or your children if they have disabilities. Belief and confidence in yourself and your own strength will help you and any kids you may have (disabled or not).
You can talk with a neuro until the cows come home-I did. They will only give you the info and the answers they want you to have. You also have the power of the internet on your side. Access to a plethora of information, studies, forums, blogs etc. Good luck my dear, you sound like an incredibly smart and caring young lady. Stay true to yourself.
 

Bernard

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CWE's newest sponsor is looking for parents (in the USA) who suspect their children might be impaired because of depakote birth defects for a potential class action lawsuit.
 
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