Maybe This Is The Answer For Most Of Us?

JLogefeil

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I thought this information was really cool. So I made a video, I would like to know if anyone every had one of these special EEG's and what are my chances of getting one? When do/does a DR. turn to one of theses EEG's? Are the EEG's mostly used for people who are having a hard time getting a diagnosis and all the tests come up fine?
Any information will do.
Please feel free to watch any/all my videos and be sure to comment and share.
Much Love, JLogefeil

Here is my video (again, sorry if I sound stupid. Don't mind me when I totally forget what I was saying, that happened s a lot):brain:

[ame]http://youtu.be/HMWWYcmWLrc[/ame]
 

Ravensong

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depth electrodes

Hi there,
I had nasopharyngeal electrodes during an EEG many years ago - I'm pretty sure that's the only way they would have detected my seizures, because the neuropsychiatrist that did the test said mine come from deep within my temporal lobe. These leads are not placed surgically; they are put in through the nostrils and are pretty uncomfortable, but there is no surgery and the test is done like a regular EEG. Funny that you should mention this here. I was thinking about asking my neuro if they still did these, because I'd really like to see if maybe he could do another EEG using these electrodes and see if it would pick up activity that the scalp electrodes are not picking up.

Also, during video monitoring in an epilepsy center, they generally insert sphenoid electrodes (I think that's right), and maybe others, which are a type of depth electrode. Been there, done that. I got more activity with the NP leads, though, I guess because of the location of my seizures.
 

bandmom

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I only just heard of the sphenoidal electrodes a couple of weeks ago, and my daughter had already had 5 video eegs. Now I'm just hearing about these nasal ones for the first time. I might want to ask her neurologist about these.

Just found on an NYU site that the "Nasopharyngeal electrodes have been used less often during the past few decades, because regular electrodes placed in front of and slightly above the ears can often provide the same information with no discomfort to the patient."
 
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Ravensong

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I only just heard of the sphenoidal electrodes a couple of weeks ago, and my daughter had already had 5 video eegs. Now I'm just hearing about these nasal ones for the first time. I might want to ask her neurologist about these.

Just found on an NYU site that the "Nasopharyngeal electrodes have been used less often during the past few decades, because regular electrodes placed in front of and slightly above the ears can often provide the same information with no discomfort to the patient."
I think the discomfort factor with both will depend on your technologist. I had a great deal of discomfort when the sphenoidal electrodes were removed (and for several days after), although not much when inserted or when they were in place. The nasopharyngeal electrodes are in place through the nostrils for the duration of the EEG and, in me, anyway, caused excessive salivation and were just generally uncomfortable (but they didn't hurt), but once they were out, I had no aftereffects.
Good luck. I think that, once I switch neurologists, I'm going to ask about them again, too.
 

Cint

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The nasopharyngeal electrodes are in place through the nostrils for the duration of the EEG and, in me, anyway, caused excessive salivation and were just generally uncomfortable (but they didn't hurt), but once they were out, I had no aftereffects.
Like bandmom stated in her post, the nasopharyngeal electrodes aren't being used as often.

http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/eeg_electrodes
Nasopharyngeal (NAY-zo-fa-RIN-je-al) electrodes are used occasionally to record electrical activity deep in the brain. They are now being used less often, however, because they involve some discomfort and doctors have found that regular electrodes often can provide the same information. These electrodes are plastic tubes with a wire inside, ending with a blunt metal tip. The electrodes are inserted through the nose until the metal tip is located in the upper back part of the nose (the nasopharynx). There may be some discomfort while the electrodes are being inserted. They are left in place for about 20 or 30 minutes during the study.
 

Ravensong

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Yeah, that's unfortunate, because that was the only way they were able to detect the abnormal activity in my brain. :-(
 
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